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June has snuck up on me, and my move looms, but I am nevertheless prepared for next week’s Boston Pride Parade with my sweet Scarlet Witch costume. My last one for the foreseeable future, but hopefully there’s a group in DC I can connect with!
Any tips on a headdress would be most appreciated. And any Bostonians should come out to support the LGBT community and see Comicopia’s awesome array of costumes. So far we’ve got a Wonder Woman, Storm, Captain America, Superman, Rogue, Aquaman, and Batwoman. The twist is that they’re all supposed to have some kind of WWII/1940s pin-up flare. I don’t think I’ve really accomplished that, but I can’t wait to see what everyone else manages!
I hope to get some of my traditional Pride Month features out this month as well, but like everything it’s subject to the time and energy constraints that my move and work stuff takes up.

June has snuck up on me, and my move looms, but I am nevertheless prepared for next week’s Boston Pride Parade with my sweet Scarlet Witch costume. My last one for the foreseeable future, but hopefully there’s a group in DC I can connect with!

Any tips on a headdress would be most appreciated. And any Bostonians should come out to support the LGBT community and see Comicopia’s awesome array of costumes. So far we’ve got a Wonder Woman, Storm, Captain America, Superman, Rogue, Aquaman, and Batwoman. The twist is that they’re all supposed to have some kind of WWII/1940s pin-up flare. I don’t think I’ve really accomplished that, but I can’t wait to see what everyone else manages!

I hope to get some of my traditional Pride Month features out this month as well, but like everything it’s subject to the time and energy constraints that my move and work stuff takes up.

susie-c:

From a piece I drew for 7x7 magazine almost exactly one year ago. Happy Pride y’all.

susie-c:

From a piece I drew for 7x7 magazine almost exactly one year ago. Happy Pride y’all.

#PrideMonth ProFile Friday

Paige Braddock is a cartoonist best known for her comic strip Jane’s World, the first queer-themed work to get distribution from a national mainstream media syndicate.

In high school, Braddock was mentored by Alley Oop cartoonist Dave Graue. She earned a degree in Fine Art from the University of Tennessee, then worked as a visual journalist for twelve years for such newspapers as the Chicago Tribune and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. She left journalism in 2000 to accept the postion of Creative Director at Charles M. Schulz Creative Associates. There she oversees art direction and editoral control of all licensed Peanuts material, including the 2012 comic book limited series published by Boom! Studios.

She devised Jane’s World in 1991 and first started the strip as a webcomic in 1996. In 2001, United Feature Syndicates’s Comics.com picked up the strip. Soon after, she founded Girl Twirl Comics to publish and distribute Jane’s World to comic book stores. In 2007, Braddock started producing new strips, now carried by Universal Press Syndicate.

In 2008, she collaborated with writer Jason McNamera on The Martian Confederacy, a graphic novel about outlaws living on Mars in 3535, where breathable air is a top commodity. A second volume was published in 2011, and a third is in the works.

Jane’s World was nominated for an Eisner Award in 2006, and 10 volumes of the strip are currently in print.

Braddock lives in California with her wife, Evelyn.

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday
Any-Themed by Queer-Identified Lady Edition
Freewheel by Liz Baillie

Freewheel is about a young girl named Jamie who is in foster care with her older brother Jack. When Jack goes missing one day, she embarks on an epic journey to find him. Along the way, she gets help from a mostly-friendly enclave of forest dwellers living in an improvised society that exists just outside of our own.

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday

Any-Themed by Queer-Identified Lady Edition

Freewheel by Liz Baillie

Freewheel is about a young girl named Jamie who is in foster care with her older brother Jack. When Jack goes missing one day, she embarks on an epic journey to find him. Along the way, she gets help from a mostly-friendly enclave of forest dwellers living in an improvised society that exists just outside of our own.

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday
Queer-Themed by Any-Identified Lady Edition
The Princess by Christine Smith

Everyone thinks Sarah is just a strange boy, but she knows she is the princess!

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday

Queer-Themed by Any-Identified Lady Edition

The Princess by Christine Smith

Everyone thinks Sarah is just a strange boy, but she knows she is the princess!

#PrideMonth ProFile Friday

Joan Hilty (born December 27, 1966) is a cartoonist and editor best known for the comic strip Bitter Girl and her tenure as a senior editor at DC Comics’s Vertigo imprint.

Hilty grew up in Northern California after some time in Kentucky and West Africa. She attended Brown University as part of the class of 1989 where she earned a BA in visual arts, which included coursework at the Rhode Island School of Design.

Her first comics were published soon after graduating college in publications such as Wimmen’s Comix, Girljock Magazine, Gay Comix, and The Advocate. Her illustrations have appeared in such publications as Ms. Magazine and The Village Voice.

She joined DC Comics as an editor in 1995, starting in the trading cards department. She was soon moved to Vertigo as well as given responsibility over licensed titles such as Scooby-Doo, Looney Tunes, and The Powerpuff Girls, as well as DCAU titles such as Batman Adventures and Gotham Girls. In the main DC Universe, she edited such titles as Birds of Prey (with writer Gail Simone), Manhunter, Black Lightning: Year One (with writer Jen Van Meter), Vixen: Return of the Lion (with writer G. Willow Wilson), Blue Beetle (starring Jaime Reyes), and Huntress: Year One (written by Ivory Madison), as well as runs on Checkmate, The Outsiders, and The Flash. She later developed some of Vertigo’s first original graphic novels, such as the G. Willow Wilson-written Cairo, the Inverna Lockpez-written Cuba: My Revolution, and the Colleen Doran-pencilled Gone to Amerikay.

Her weekly alternative comic strip Bitter Girl was first published in 1998, inspired by an ill-fated relationship. Since 2001, it has ben distributed by Q Syndicate to LGBT newspapers across North America. She also posts strips to her blog a few weeks after they are released in print.

In 2010, she left DC Comics in the midst of the company’s restructuring. She is now the editor-in-chief of PageTurner, a book packager that specializes in graphic novels, as well as the owner of Studio Kabito, an independent editor specializing in genre fiction, nonfiction & graphic novels. She currently lives in New York City with her wife and teaches at the Maryland Institute College of Art.

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday
Any-Themed by Queer-Identified Lady Edition
RPG by Stacie Ponder

RPG is a high-fantasy webcomic that pays tribute to the conventions found in well-loved roleplaying games from yesterday and today. The comic follows Alyth, a farm girl who finds herself cast in the unlikely role of world-saving hero when her village is destroyed. She journeys all across the land of Hyberia and battles fearsome monsters, loots every dead body she can, acquires party companions, visits taverns, levels up, and completes quests both large and small as she attempts to foil the forces of evil.

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday

Any-Themed by Queer-Identified Lady Edition

RPG by Stacie Ponder

RPG is a high-fantasy webcomic that pays tribute to the conventions found in well-loved roleplaying games from yesterday and today. The comic follows Alyth, a farm girl who finds herself cast in the unlikely role of world-saving hero when her village is destroyed. She journeys all across the land of Hyberia and battles fearsome monsters, loots every dead body she can, acquires party companions, visits taverns, levels up, and completes quests both large and small as she attempts to foil the forces of evil.

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday
Queer-Themed by Any-Identified Lady Edition
Grace by Kris Dresen

What do you do when you’re attracted to the model in your life drawing class?

Available in print!  Why not buy it (or any of Dresen’s other comics) as a birthday present for her?  Because today is also her birthday!

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday

Queer-Themed by Any-Identified Lady Edition

Grace by Kris Dresen

What do you do when you’re attracted to the model in your life drawing class?

Available in print!  Why not buy it (or any of Dresen’s other comics) as a birthday present for her?  Because today is also her birthday!

On my way to Boston Pride to walk with Comicopia! Come on down if you can!

On my way to Boston Pride to walk with Comicopia! Come on down if you can!

#PrideMonth ProFile Friday

Ariel Schrag (born December 29, 1979, in Berkeley, California) is the creator of the autobiographical comics AwkwardDefinitionPotential, and Likewise. She was also a writer for the HBO series “How To Make It In America” and the Showtime series “The L Word.”

While attending high school in Berkeley, California, Schrag self-published her first comic series, Awkward, depicting events from her freshman year, originally selling copies to friends and family. Slave Labor Graphics subsequently reprinted Awkward as a graphic novel, followed by three more books based on her next three years of school: DefinitionPotential, and Likewise. The books were republished by Touchstone/Simon & Schuster in 2008 and 2009. The books tell stories of family life, going to concerts, experimenting with drugs, high school crushes, and coming out as a bisexual and later as a lesbian.

Schrag was nominated for the 1998 Kimberly Yale Award for Best New Talent (administered by the Friends of Lulu). In the same year, she graduated from Berkeley High School in 1998. She graduated from Columbia University with a bachelor’s degree in English in 2003, and has continued to work as a cartoonist.

The documentary Confession: A Film About Ariel Schrag was released in 2004. It explores the then-23-year-old Schrag’s world in which she “negotiates fame, obsesses about disease, and discusses the way she sees as a dyke comic book artist.” Schrag was a writer for the third and fourth seasons of the Showtime series The L Word. In 2011, she wrote for the HBO series How To Make It in America.

Killer Films is producing a movie adaptation of Potential; Schrag has written the screenplay. Schrag was listed in The Advocate’s list of “Forty under Forty” out media professionals in its June-July 2009 issue. She currently lives in Los Angeles, California.

Bibliography

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday: Any-Themed by Queer-Identified Creator Edition
Thingpart by Joey Allison Sayers

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday: Any-Themed by Queer-Identified Creator Edition

Thingpart by Joey Allison Sayers

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday: Queer-Themed by Any-Identified Lady Edition
Jesus Loves Lesbians Too, written by Maria Burnham, art by Maggie Siegel-Berele

Memoirs of life as a part-time lesbian and a full-time Christian
Do you like laughing? Do you like comics? Do you like laughing at comics that portray what life is like when you are a straight girl that likes her girlfriend AND Jesus Christ? This is a collection of sweet and silly memoirs that will hopefully reach you, whether you are gay or think you may be gay or worry about the church finding out you are thinking about maybe being gay, or whether you just like the gays and comics and me.

#PrideMonth Webcomics Wednesday: Queer-Themed by Any-Identified Lady Edition

Jesus Loves Lesbians Too, written by Maria Burnham, art by Maggie Siegel-Berele

Memoirs of life as a part-time lesbian and a full-time Christian

Do you like laughing? Do you like comics? Do you like laughing at comics that portray what life is like when you are a straight girl that likes her girlfriend AND Jesus Christ? This is a collection of sweet and silly memoirs that will hopefully reach you, whether you are gay or think you may be gay or worry about the church finding out you are thinking about maybe being gay, or whether you just like the gays and comics and me.

#PrideMonth ProFile Friday

Tove Marika Jansson (August 9, 1914 – June 27, 2001) was a Swedish-Finnish novelist, painter, illustrator and comic strip author. She is best known as the author of the Moomin books.

Tove Jansson was born in Helsinki, Finland, which was then a part of the Grand Duchy of Finland. Her family, part of the Swedish-speaking (Swedish: finlandssvensk) minority of Finland, was an artistic one: her father Viktor Jansson was a sculptor and her mother Signe Hammarsten-Jansson was a graphic designer and illustrator. Tove’s siblings also became artists: Per Olov Jansson became a photographer and Lars Jansson an author and cartoonist.

She studied at University College of Arts, Crafts and Design in Stockholm in 1930–33, the Graphic School of the Finnish Academy of Fine Arts in 1933–1937 and finally at L’École d’Adrien Holy and L’École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1938. She displayed a number of artworks in exhibitions during the 30s and early 40s, and her first solo exhibition was held in 1943.

Jansson wrote and illustrated her first Moomin book, The Moomins and the Great Flood, in 1945, during World War II. She said later that the war had depressed her and she had wanted to write something naïve and innocent. This first book was hardly noticed, but the next Moomin books, Comet in Moominland (1946) and Finn Family Moomintroll (1948), made her famous. She went on to write six more Moomin books, a number of picture books and comic strips. Her fame spread quickly and she became Finland’s most widely read author abroad. In 1966 she was awarded the Hans Christian Andersen Award.

Jansson continued painting and writing for the rest of her life, although her contributions to the Moomin series became rare after 1970. Her first foray outside children’s literature was Bildhuggarens dotter (Sculptor’s Daughter), a semi-autobiographical book written in 1968. After that, she authored five more novels, including Sommarboken(The Summer Book) and five collections of short stories. Although she had a studio in Helsinki, she lived much of her life on a small island called Klovharu, one of the Pellinki Islands near the town of Porvoo. Jansson lived with her female partner, the graphic artist Tuulikki Pietilä.

Jansson is principally known as the author of the Moomin books – stories for children that involve Jansson’s creations, the Moomins. They are a family of trolls who are white, round and furry in appearance, with large snouts that make them vaguely resemble hippopotamuses.

The first Moomin book, The Moomins and the Great Flood, was written in 1945. Although the primary characters are Moominmamma and Moomintroll, most of the principal characters of later stories were only introduced in the next book, so The Moomins and the Great Flood is frequently considered a forerunner to the main series. The book was not a success (and was the last Moomin book to be translated into English), but the next two installments in the Moomin series, Comet in Moominland (1946) and Finn Family Moomintroll (1948), brought Jansson fame. The original title of Finn Family MoomintrollTrollkarlens Hatt, translates as “The Magician’s Hat”.

The style of the Moomin books changed as time went by. The first books, up to Moominland Midwinter (1957), are adventure stories that include floods, comets and supernatural events. The Moomins and the Great Flood deals with Moominmamma and Moomintroll’s flight through a dark and scary forest, where they encounter various dangers. In Comet in Moominland, a comet nearly destroys the Moominvalley (some critics have considered this an allegory of nuclear weapons). Finn Family Moomintroll deals with adventures brought on by the discovery of a magician’s hat. The Exploits of Moominpappa (1950) tells the story of Moominpappa’s adventurous youth and cheerfully parodies the genre of memoirs. Finally, Moominsummer Madness (1955) pokes fun at the world of the theatre: the Moomins explore an empty theatre and perform Moominpappa’s pompous hexametric melodrama.

Moominland Midwinter marks a turning point in the series. The books take on more realistic settings (“realistic” in the context of the Moomin universe) and the characters start to acquire some psychological depth. Moominland Midwinter focuses on Moomintroll, who wakes up in the middle of the winter (Moomins sleep from November to April, as mentioned on the back of the book), and has to cope with the strange and unfriendly world he finds. The short story collection Tales from Moominvalley (1962) and the novels Moominpappa at Sea (1965) andMoominvalley in November (1970) are serious and psychologically searching books, far removed from the light-heartedness and cheerful humor of Finn Family Moomintroll.

After Moominvalley in November Tove Jansson stopped writing about Moomins and started writing for adults. The Summer Book is the best known of her adult fiction translated into English. It is a work of charm, subtlety and simplicity, describing the summer stay on an island of a young girl and her grandmother.

Besides the Moomin novels and short stories, Tove Jansson also wrote and illustrated four original and highly popular picture books: The Book about Moomin, Mymble and Little My (1952), Who will Comfort Toffle? (1960),The Dangerous Journey (1977) and An Unwanted Guest (1980). As the Moomins’ fame grew, two of the original novels, Comet in Moominland and The Exploits of Moominpappa, were revised by Jansson and republished.

Tove Jansson worked as illustrator and cartoonist for the Swedish-language satirical magazine Garm from the 1930s to 1953. One of her political cartoons achieved a brief international fame: she drew Adolf Hitler as a crying baby in diapers, surrounded by Neville Chamberlain and other great European leaders, who tried to calm the baby down by giving it slices of cake – Austria, Poland, Czechoslovakia, etc. Jansson also produced illustrations during this period for the Christmas magazines Julen and Lucifer (just as her mother had earlier) as well as several smaller productions. Her earliest comic strips were produced for productions including Lunkentus (Prickinas och Fabians äventyr, 1929), Vårbrodd (Fotbollen som Flög till Himlen, 1930), and Allas Krönika (Palle och Göran gå till sjöss, 1933).

The figure of the Moomintroll appeared first in Jansson’s political cartoons, where it was used as a signature character near the artist’s name. This “Proto-Moomin,” then called Snork or Niisku, was thin and ugly, with a long, narrow nose and devilish tail. Jansson said that she had designed the Moomins in her youth: after she lost a philosophical quarrel about Immanuel Kant with one of her brothers, she drew “the ugliest creature imaginable” on the wall of their WC and wrote under it “Kant”. This Moomin later gained weight and a more pleasant appearance, but in the first Moomin book The Moomins and the Great Flood (originally Småtrollen och den stora översvämningen), the Immanuel-Kant-Moomin is still perceptible. The name “Moomin” comes from Tove Jansson’s uncle, Einar Hammarsten: when she was studying in Stockholm and living with her Swedish relations, her uncle tried to stop her pilfering food by telling her that a “Moomintroll” lived in the kitchen closet and breathed cold air down people’s necks.

In 1952, after Comet in Moominland and Finn Family Moomintroll had been translated into English, a British publisher asked if Tove Jansson would be interested in drawing comic strips about the Moomins. Jansson had already drawn a long Moomin comic adventure, Mumintrollet och jordens undergång (“Moomintrolls and the End of the World”), based loosely on Comet in Moominland, for the Swedish-language newspaper Ny Tid, and she accepted the offer. The comic strip Moomintroll, started in 1954 in the Evening News, a newspaper for the London area and London commuters (no longer in business). Tove Jansson drew 21 long Moomin stories from 1954 to 1959, writing them at first by herself and then with her brother Lars Jansson. She eventually gave the strip up because the daily work of a comic artist did not leave her time to write books and paint, but Lars took over the strip and continued it until 1975.

The series was published in book form in Swedish, and books 1 to 5 have been published in English, Moomin: The Complete Tove Jansson Comic Strip.

Although she became known first and foremost as an author, Tove Jansson considered her careers as author and painter to be of equal importance. She painted her whole life, changing style from the classical impressionism of her youth to the highly abstract modernist style of her later years. Jansson displayed a number of artworks in exhibitions during the 1930s and early 1940s, and her first solo exhibition was held in 1943. Despite generally positive reviews, criticism induced Jansson to refine her style such that in her 1955 solo exhibition her style had become less overloaded in terms of detail and content. Between 1960 and 1970 Jansson held five more solo exhibitions.

Jansson also created a series of commissioned murals and public works throughout her career, which may still be viewed in their original locations. These works of Jansson’s included:

  • The canteen at the Strömberg factory at Pitäjänmäki, Helsinki (1945)
  • The Aurora Children’s Hospital in Helsinki
  • The Kaupunginkellari restaurant of Helsinki Town Hall
  • The Seurahuone hotel at Hamina
  • The Wise and Foolish Virgins altarpiece in Teuva Church (1954)
  • A number of fairy-tale murals in schools and kindergartens including the kindergarten in Pori (1984)

In addition to providing the illustrations for her own Moomin books, Jansson also illustrated Swedish translations of classics such as J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit and Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (some used later in Finnish translations as well). She also illustrated her late work,The Summer Book (1972).

In 1966, Jansson won the Hans Christian Andersen Award for her contributions to children’s literature.

Jansson’s Moomin books, originally written in Swedish, have been translated into 33 languages. After the Kalevalaand books by Mika Waltari, they are the most widely translated works of Finnish literature.

The Moomin Museum in Tampere displays much of Jansson’s work on the Moomins. There is also a Moomin theme park named Moomin World in Naantali.

Tove Jansson was selected as the main motif in a recent Finnish commemorative coin, the €10 Tove Jansson and Finnish Children’s Culture commemorative coin, minted in 2004. The obverse depicts a combination of Tove Jansson portrait with several objects: the skyline, an artist’s palette, a crescent and a sailing boat. The reverse design features three Moomin characters.

Welcome to the 2nd Annual LMC Pride Month!

It’s June 1st, which means it’s the start of LGBTQ Pride Month, with parades happening the world over in commemoration of the 1969 Stonewall Riots—a watershed event in queer rights, started when a cross-dressing black lesbian punched a cop in the face, which is possibly the best summation of the oppressed “Other” refusing to take shit from the dominant hegemony that has ever occurred in human history.

I’ll be featuring ProFiles of LBT women(-identifying) creators, as well as webcomics by LBT women and/or featuring LGBTQ themes.

I’m still in the midst of barely contained chaos in my life right now, so I’m also taking this opportunity to kick my ass back into gear (though I will be on actual vacation this coming week, so I will do the best I can on the cruise ship’s wi-fi).

Also, if you’re in the Boston area, some heads-ups for the coming month: my LCS, Comicopia, will have a marching group in next Saturday’s Pride Parade, where you will see some amazing costumes such as Red Sonja, She-Ra, and yours truly as Rainbow Dash!  In addition, Marjorie Liu will be signing Astonishing X-Men #51 (Northstar and Kyle’s wedding issue!) at Comicopia on June 23rd. I do intend to get back on a semi-regular events posting cycle soon, so hopefully these will be the first of many Pride-related events I’ll be letting you know about!

ETA: In the comments, Joamette Gil brought up Sylvia Rivera, a Puerto Rican transwoman as being the one who started the Stonewall Riots.  By her own account she was definitely there the night of the raid, but nothing to suggest that she was the one who threw the fabled punch. Wikipedia says the identity of the woman is unknown, but I dug up the name of the woman I’d first heard the story attributed to: Stormé DeLarverie. Check out this clip from In The Life about her.

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