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Black History Month Webcomics Wednesday
Stampede: Jessica’s Story by Chantelle Awere

Youth crime is on the rise in England as the gap between social classes increases. Resulting in an increase in street “gangs.” To tackle this problem the government made a plan to reform these unruly teenagers by giving these youths an incentive. Which was providing them with their own housing and “pocket” money but only if they study a course of the government’s choice, stay out of trouble and attend classes as often as necessary. A quick fix to a very complicated problem.
Stampede: Jessica’s story is about a troubled angry girl stuck under one of the government’s incentives and her empathetic classmate named Ryam who befriends her. But as Jessica slowly falls back into street gang culture, Ryam also finds himself falling in with her as he tries to help her to stop. Deep into a downward spiral of fight clubs, hatred and gang rivalry. Will both of them get out of it alive or will it end tragically? Is there any hope for a hurt and struggling youth?

Stampede was inspired by her life growing up in South London and the racial and class disparities and youth alienation she observed. Chantelle’s on tumblr as eternalbeliever12

Black History Month Webcomics Wednesday

Stampede: Jessica’s Story by Chantelle Awere

Youth crime is on the rise in England as the gap between social classes increases. Resulting in an increase in street “gangs.” To tackle this problem the government made a plan to reform these unruly teenagers by giving these youths an incentive. Which was providing them with their own housing and “pocket” money but only if they study a course of the government’s choice, stay out of trouble and attend classes as often as necessary. A quick fix to a very complicated problem.

Stampede: Jessica’s story is about a troubled angry girl stuck under one of the government’s incentives and her empathetic classmate named Ryam who befriends her. But as Jessica slowly falls back into street gang culture, Ryam also finds himself falling in with her as he tries to help her to stop. Deep into a downward spiral of fight clubs, hatred and gang rivalry. Will both of them get out of it alive or will it end tragically? Is there any hope for a hurt and struggling youth?

Stampede was inspired by her life growing up in South London and the racial and class disparities and youth alienation she observed. Chantelle’s on tumblr as eternalbeliever12

Black History Month Webcomics Wednesday
Love! Love! Fighting! by Sharean Morishita

Oriana is a young woman who’s lived her life taking care of others and putting herself last but now that she is coming face to face with a tough question “What do you want to do with your life?” she’s having a hard time finding the answer. With a sharp tongue and strong heart Oriana goes on her journey to learning some very valuable life lessons about family, beauty, love and finding her place in life.

Sharean was nominated for the Glyph Awards Rising Star in 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at sky-art-and-design.

Black History Month Webcomics Wednesday

Love! Love! Fighting! by Sharean Morishita

Oriana is a young woman who’s lived her life taking care of others and putting herself last but now that she is coming face to face with a tough question “What do you want to do with your life?” she’s having a hard time finding the answer. With a sharp tongue and strong heart Oriana goes on her journey to learning some very valuable life lessons about family, beauty, love and finding her place in life.

Sharean was nominated for the Glyph Awards Rising Star in 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at sky-art-and-design.

Black History Month ProFile Friday

Natashia McGough is a working writer and editor in all facets of the entertainment and literary industry.

McGough started off as a staff writer for her elementary school’s newspaper “The News.” She later wrote for the creative publications of her high school’s advanced English classes. While attending Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, she had internships with local newspapers and magazines in Atlanta, Houston, Texas, Atlanta, and London, England, as well as being the campus and local editor for her college’s newspaper, The Spelman Spotlight.

She has written comic strips for local comic magazine Cee Somefun in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as written two comic books, God Drug and Danity Kane, both published by Eigomanga Anime Multimedia Company and Devil’s Due. Danity Kane was co-written with Dawn Richard, member of the band of the same name, about “a teenage girl from a faraway planet who comes to Earth to save her people, fighting a secret war between her klan and the tyrants that oppress them.”

McGough has written several feature screenplays and two TV spec scripts. She has produced and written her own short films, which have received great recognition as the Organ Mountain Rio Grande film festival’s Governor’s Hall of Fame winner, Audience Choice Award Winner at the Holly Shorts Film Festival, and Myrtle Beach International film festival’s top seven finalist. She has been an apprentice to several professional writers of the industry, as well as worked as an Assistant on several TV shows; such as a TV Series, Night Stalker, produced by ABC/ Touchstone Television, a one hour comedy, The Underground, produced by Showtime and Damon Wayans Productions, and an animated TV series, The Goode Family, produced by ABC Television Network.

In 2010, she co-produced V.I.P.s: Very Important Professionals, which “profiles minority professionals who achieved their dreams of success through hard work and the pursuit of higher education despite their troubled upbringings”.

She has written, directed, and produced a well received play Shadow Faces, which opened at the Space Theatre in Hollywood, CA on June 16, 2006. She has also edited a published self help book by savvy businessman Mike Roberts Sr. and has performed professional ghost-writing for a literary publishing company, Arborbooks. She has ghost-written several authors’ books.

A native of Houston, Texas, she currently resides in Los Angeles, California.

Black History Month Webcomics Wednesday
M.F.K. by Nilah Magruder

In a world of sleeping gods, a broken government, and a fragile peace held in the hands of the corrupt, one youth must find the strength to stand up against evil and save humanity.
This story is not about that youth.
It’s about Abbie, who just wants to get to the mountain range called the Potter’s Spine, scatter her mother’s ashes, and then live out her life in sweet, blissful solitude.  Unfortunately, everyone she meets wants to either whine at her about their woes, tag along on her quest, arrest her for no reason, or blow her to bits.
Journeys are hard on the social recluses of the world.

Nilah is a storyboard artist in Hollywood, has worked on promotional materials for Pixar and Marvel films, and has produced graphics for Nerdist Industries. You can find Nilah on Tumblr as nilaffle

Black History Month Webcomics Wednesday

M.F.K. by Nilah Magruder

In a world of sleeping gods, a broken government, and a fragile peace held in the hands of the corrupt, one youth must find the strength to stand up against evil and save humanity.

This story is not about that youth.

It’s about Abbie, who just wants to get to the mountain range called the Potter’s Spine, scatter her mother’s ashes, and then live out her life in sweet, blissful solitude.  Unfortunately, everyone she meets wants to either whine at her about their woes, tag along on her quest, arrest her for no reason, or blow her to bits.

Journeys are hard on the social recluses of the world.

Nilah is a storyboard artist in Hollywood, has worked on promotional materials for Pixar and Marvel films, and has produced graphics for Nerdist Industries. You can find Nilah on Tumblr as nilaffle

theladybadass:

Jackie Ormes (August 1, 1911 – December 26, 1985) is known as the first African American female cartoonist. Her strips, featuring the lovable characters Torchy Brown, Candy, Patty-Jo, and Ginger, appeared in the Chicago Defender and Pittsburgh Courier in the 1930s - 1950s. 

Jackie Ormes said, “No more…Sambos…Just KIDS!” and she transformed her attractive, spunky Patty-Jo cartoon character into the first upscale American black doll. At long last, here was an African American doll with all the play features children desired: playable hair, and the finest and most extensive wardrobe on the market, with all manner of dresses, formals, shoes, hats, nightgowns, robes, skating and cowgirl costumes, and spring and winter coat sets, to name a few. (Jackie Ormes Online)

I finally got Nancy Goldstein’s biography of Jackie Ormes for Christmas, and it’s fascinating stuff. I love that we have this video (or gifset of a video) of her at work. It is rare enough to see footage of any women cartoonists from this era, even fewer with merchandise based on their work. Jackie Ormes’s importance to the history of both women cartoonists and black cartoonists cannot be understated.

(via comicbookslumberparty)

Webcomics Wednesday: #BlackHistoryMonth Edition
JOE! by Michelle Billingsley

JOE! is a sarcastic and mischievous 10-year-old, known among his loved ones for being the lil’ brat in their lives. Whether he’s with family, friends, or at school, Joe frequently finds his way into trouble. He usually has a smart-aleck response to get him back out of it, but that doesn’t always work. This kid is definitely the poster child of punishment.
This comic provides an amusing look at the world through the eyes of one of its future citizens. Each strip is combined with imaginatively-exploited everyday storylines, which makes for a memorable read. Joe along with his family and friends, welcomes you to his world, in the hope of inspiring yours.

Webcomics Wednesday: #BlackHistoryMonth Edition

JOE! by Michelle Billingsley

JOE! is a sarcastic and mischievous 10-year-old, known among his loved ones for being the lil’ brat in their lives. Whether he’s with family, friends, or at school, Joe frequently finds his way into trouble. He usually has a smart-aleck response to get him back out of it, but that doesn’t always work. This kid is definitely the poster child of punishment.

This comic provides an amusing look at the world through the eyes of one of its future citizens. Each strip is combined with imaginatively-exploited everyday storylines, which makes for a memorable read. Joe along with his family and friends, welcomes you to his world, in the hope of inspiring yours.

Weekly Webcomics: #BlackHistoryMonth Edition

Fashion Forward written by Shawnee and Shawnelle Gibbs, art by Linda Chung

Set in the cutthroat world of the competitive New York fashion industry, the series takes a satirical look at what happens when Sam Tate, an MIT drop-out turned fashion assistant, uses technology to advance in haute couture.



 Blending elements of comedy, adventure and sci-fi, Fashion Forward, is a tale of morality that will make readers laugh and sit on the edge of their seats as heroine, Sam Tate, embarks on a journey that may change the future of one of New York’s most celebrated industries.



The first print issue is due for release March 5th, keep an eye out!

image

Black History Month ProFile “Friday”*
Traci Todd is the Senior Editor of VizKids, the children’s imprint of Viz Media manga publishing.
Todd graduated from Northwestern University in 1995 with a degree in communications. She went to work as a content writer for Jellyvision, the software company behind the award-winning “You Don’t Know Jack” and the licensed “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” CD-ROM games, to which Todd contributed. She worked for both Oprah.com and Harpo Productions, Inc. writing materials based on the content and themes of the Oprah Winfrey Show, including an eLearning initiative.
Much of her work has been in an educational vein aimed at a wide range of ages, including researching and scripting an online Cognitive Psychology course and producing multi-curricular interactive LeapFrog books for children aged 4-7. She also developed and co-taught a course on “The Art and Innovation of the Children’s Book” for California College of the Arts during the Spring 2008 semester.
She has worked as a children’s book editor for McGraw-Hill, Heinemann Publishing, and Chronicle Books before going to work for Viz Media in 2008. At Viz, she spearheaded efforts to expand beyond translated Japanese material, including manga based on the Nickelodeon Voltron Force show and the Mr. Men and Little Miss series. They also licensed the original Italian Winx Club comics in conjunction with the cartoon’s broadcast on Nickelodeon.
(*yes, this is a day late because being a grown up sucks and I couldn’t brain after work yesterday)

Black History Month ProFile “Friday”*

Traci Todd is the Senior Editor of VizKids, the children’s imprint of Viz Media manga publishing.

Todd graduated from Northwestern University in 1995 with a degree in communications. She went to work as a content writer for Jellyvision, the software company behind the award-winning “You Don’t Know Jack” and the licensed “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” CD-ROM games, to which Todd contributed. She worked for both Oprah.com and Harpo Productions, Inc. writing materials based on the content and themes of the Oprah Winfrey Show, including an eLearning initiative.

Much of her work has been in an educational vein aimed at a wide range of ages, including researching and scripting an online Cognitive Psychology course and producing multi-curricular interactive LeapFrog books for children aged 4-7. She also developed and co-taught a course on “The Art and Innovation of the Children’s Book” for California College of the Arts during the Spring 2008 semester.

She has worked as a children’s book editor for McGraw-Hill, Heinemann Publishing, and Chronicle Books before going to work for Viz Media in 2008. At Viz, she spearheaded efforts to expand beyond translated Japanese material, including manga based on the Nickelodeon Voltron Force show and the Mr. Men and Little Miss series. They also licensed the original Italian Winx Club comics in conjunction with the cartoon’s broadcast on Nickelodeon.

(*yes, this is a day late because being a grown up sucks and I couldn’t brain after work yesterday)

#BlackHistoryMonth ProFile Friday

Carol M. Burrell is a cartoonist and the editorial director of the Graphic Universe imprint of Lerner Publishing Group.

A native New Yorker, Burrell is an alumna of Cornell University, where she majored in Classics.  She has also lived in Wales and Italy

In 2005, she launched her webcomic SPQR Blues (as Klio) an historical drama that takes place in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius. Most of the characters are based on the actual inhabitants of the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, whose names are known from graffiti, inscriptions, and the records of a notorious (and unresolved) ancient lawsuit.  She was nominated for a 2008 Glyph Awards Rising Star Award.

In 2008, she started working at Graphic Universe, where she has worked with such creators as Trina Robbins, Joëlle Jones, and Dylan Meconis.

As an artist, she cites Leonardo da Vinci, Hal Foster’s Prince Valiant, and Elfquest by Wendy and Richard Pini as her three biggest influences.

#BlackHistoryMonth ProFile Friday

Leilani Hickerson is a freelance illustrator and comics creator.

She was born in the heartland of New Jersey in the year of 1983. She graduated in 2006 from The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. There she received her BFA in Illustration and the university’s most distinguished illustration award. 

She contributed to the Black Comix anthology and drew the adaptation of Ethel M. Caution’s “The Buyers of Dreams” for African-American Graphic Classics.  Her work has been featured in the travelling exhibition "Out of Sequence: Underrepresented Voices in American Comics" and "Beyond the Frame: African American Comic Book Artists".  She has also collaborated with Marvel/DC pencillers Yvel Guichet and Joe Rubenstein.  She is currently collaborating with her sister on a children’s comic called My Hafu.

Links

#BlackHistoryMonth ProFile Friday

Patrice Aggs is an illustrator originally from Detroit, Michigan who works in the UK. She studied at St John’s College, Annapolis and City & Guilds Art School in London, and has illustrated more than 50 children’s books, including Philip Pullman’s Count Karlstein graphic novel, and worked in animation, including on The Snowman. In 2008 she drew The Boss, written by her son John Aggs, for The DFC, a comics anthology for children published by Random House.  She is writing and drawing “What Will Happen Next?!” for The DFC’s spiritual successor, The Phoenix, launched in 2012.

She has also contributed to the Whores of Mensa and The Strumpet anthologies for adults.

Words of Wisdom

Do-it-yourself is far duller than do-it-together. We need to champion each other. Drag the male-dominated blinkered attitude into the dustbin.

Black Comics History Mystery!
Above is a comic by one Doris McClarty originally published in the October 1955 issue of Hep Magazine, a black magazine based out of Fort Worth, Texas.  It was reprinted in the R. Crumb edited anthology Weirdo #6— along with a plea for help locating her and another Hep cartoonist (Butch Austin) so that he could pay them!  
I’ve been able to find no  further information that certainly links a person to this comic, though I did request a Social Security record for a “Doris N. McClarty Dav” who lived from 1930 to 2007 and was issued her SSN in Texas, but I’m still waiting for that to come.  I also found the obituary for Doris Laverne Davis-McClarty, who was indeed African-American.  She also left behind children, though I have not been able to find them (not even on Facebook!)
I may yet have to go to the History Detectives about this, but I love this part of comics historianing.  And if anyone has any possible leads (maybe vintage Hep issues, or even just a favorite genealogical resource), I would of course greatly appreciate it!

Black Comics History Mystery!

Above is a comic by one Doris McClarty originally published in the October 1955 issue of Hep Magazine, a black magazine based out of Fort Worth, Texas.  It was reprinted in the R. Crumb edited anthology Weirdo #6— along with a plea for help locating her and another Hep cartoonist (Butch Austin) so that he could pay them!  

I’ve been able to find no  further information that certainly links a person to this comic, though I did request a Social Security record for a “Doris N. McClarty Dav” who lived from 1930 to 2007 and was issued her SSN in Texas, but I’m still waiting for that to come.  I also found the obituary for Doris Laverne Davis-McClarty, who was indeed African-American.  She also left behind children, though I have not been able to find them (not even on Facebook!)

I may yet have to go to the History Detectives about this, but I love this part of comics historianing.  And if anyone has any possible leads (maybe vintage Hep issues, or even just a favorite genealogical resource), I would of course greatly appreciate it!

Black History Month is wonderful. But the best thing about our history is that it’s not going anywhere. It’ll be there for us whenever we need it. But the present? That can slip through our hands like water if we don’t pay attention—water that can thin the “gumbo” and dilute its flavor.

So, for the next twenty-eight days, I propose we kick off a celebration of Black Present Month by gifting ourselves with wonderful creations by inspired artists and writers currently putting pen to paper and digit to keyboard. What’s out there now that we can pluck from the shelves or add to our feeds?

And for those of us who feel the drive to create as well as consume? Well, a Black Future Month is in order. The pot’s waiting.

Throw something new in it.

Cheryl Lynn “Digital Femme” Eaton

Cheryl Lynn is the founder of the Ormes Society, an organization supporting black female comics creators, characters, and consumers.  Her work has been invaluable to the development of the Black Creators category at the Women in Comics Wiki, and I support her proposal 100%.

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