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Posts tagged "Trina Robbins"
A week ago at the Eisner Awards, Trina Robbins was inducted into the Will Eisner Hall of Fame. She brought the number of women in the Hall of Fame up to four (out of 128). Hers was the last name announced, and I had already braced myself for disappointment when Sergio Aragonés said that the final inductee was “the most deserving” and called her name.
I didn’t need a legend like Aragonés to tell me that, but I’m happy he agrees. Because here’s what Trina Robbins’s induction into the Hall of Fame means: Women matter to comics.
Trina edited the first all-women’s comics anthology, It Ain’t Me Babe, co-founded the ongoing Wimmen’s Comix (which launched careers such as Melinda Gebbie and Roberta Gregory), and dug through the forgotten parts of comics history to find such lost treasures as Nell Brinkley, Fran Hopper, and Lily Renée; she has written three editions of the history of women in comics, with her definitive volume coming out later this year. Throughout the ’80s and ’90s, she was a gadfly on the comics industry, pressing them to produce more books for girls, leading to such efforts as the Marvel-published Misty and Barbie series (the latter of which had an almost-completely female creative staff and was an early showcase of Amanda Conner’s art), the DC-published Legend of Wonder Woman and Wonder Woman: The Once and Future Story, and her own superhero creation (with artist Anne Timmons) GoGirl! Even this year, parallel to San Diego Comic-Con itself, she curated an exhibit on women in comics for the Women’s Museum of California. This blog and the Women in Comics Wiki would be the poorer without her. Trina Robbins’s name is synonymous with “women in comics”.
And the Eisner judges inducted Trina Robbins into the Hall of Fame, alongside Jack Kirby, Stan Lee, Moëbius, Osamu Tezuka, and everyone from EC Comics. Trina Robbins is as important and as valuable to comics as these men because women are important to comics. Their talent and contributions are often ignored, forgotten, or diminished, and Trina Robbins was the first to put up a fight against such obscurity, not just for herself, but for all women who had ever worked in comics.
We can hope that the gates are now flung fully open for the lost women of comics history to receive their due and bring more parity to the Hall of Fame. But the future is most certainly bright, because after the awards ceremony was over—after Hope Larson, Becky Cloonan, and the Fiona Staples-drawn Saga took home their statues—Trina said to me, “Well, I’m glad I gave up drawing, because I could never compete with all the amazing women artists working today.”

A week ago at the Eisner Awards, Trina Robbins was inducted into the Will Eisner Hall of Fame. She brought the number of women in the Hall of Fame up to four (out of 128). Hers was the last name announced, and I had already braced myself for disappointment when Sergio Aragonés said that the final inductee was “the most deserving” and called her name.

I didn’t need a legend like Aragonés to tell me that, but I’m happy he agrees. Because here’s what Trina Robbins’s induction into the Hall of Fame means: Women matter to comics.

Trina edited the first all-women’s comics anthology, It Ain’t Me Babe, co-founded the ongoing Wimmen’s Comix (which launched careers such as Melinda Gebbie and Roberta Gregory), and dug through the forgotten parts of comics history to find such lost treasures as Nell Brinkley, Fran Hopper, and Lily Renée; she has written three editions of the history of women in comics, with her definitive volume coming out later this year. Throughout the ’80s and ’90s, she was a gadfly on the comics industry, pressing them to produce more books for girls, leading to such efforts as the Marvel-published Misty and Barbie series (the latter of which had an almost-completely female creative staff and was an early showcase of Amanda Conner’s art), the DC-published Legend of Wonder Woman and Wonder Woman: The Once and Future Story, and her own superhero creation (with artist Anne Timmons) GoGirl! Even this year, parallel to San Diego Comic-Con itself, she curated an exhibit on women in comics for the Women’s Museum of California. This blog and the Women in Comics Wiki would be the poorer without her. Trina Robbins’s name is synonymous with “women in comics”.

And the Eisner judges inducted Trina Robbins into the Hall of Fame, alongside Jack Kirby, Stan Lee, Moëbius, Osamu Tezuka, and everyone from EC Comics. Trina Robbins is as important and as valuable to comics as these men because women are important to comics. Their talent and contributions are often ignored, forgotten, or diminished, and Trina Robbins was the first to put up a fight against such obscurity, not just for herself, but for all women who had ever worked in comics.

We can hope that the gates are now flung fully open for the lost women of comics history to receive their due and bring more parity to the Hall of Fame. But the future is most certainly bright, because after the awards ceremony was over—after Hope Larson, Becky Cloonan, and the Fiona Staples-drawn Saga took home their statues—Trina said to me, “Well, I’m glad I gave up drawing, because I could never compete with all the amazing women artists working today.”

Weekly Roundup of cool news: March 10-16, 2013

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The arts scene is flourishing in post-revolution Egypt and comics are no exception! A new organization, Mazg (which means incorporation or blending), seeks to teach comics creation and establish a proper comics industry in Egypt. It was founded by four women, Mona Al-Masry, Naglaa Koora, Sara Al-Masry and Nevien Adel, who have “different experiences in cultural administration, human rights activism and art”. Their goals include bringing comics workshops to the provinces, translations of foreign comics, and establish an Egyptian comics festival.

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In case you were wondering, above is the panel of Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis that got it yanked from a 7th grade curriculum in Chicago Public Schools. The Chicago-area ALA has released a statement.

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This week was a good week for crowdfunding! (If you’re trying to make a movie based on a recentish cult TV show, anyway). Two comics fundraisers that caught my eye. Graham Cracker Comics store, also in Chicago, hosts a regular Ladies’ Night, and several of its regulars have put together an anthology! They’re trying to raise $1000, and are currently over a quarter of the way there. A mere $2 gets you a digital copy and $10 gets you a physical copy as well! Also, Every/Body, a follow-up to the pro-marriage equality anthology Little Heart, is an anthology discussing body and gender, and they are just $200 shy of hitting their $2500 goal!

Also, just a reminder that I have a Crowdfunding board on Pinterest, with many other worth projects to check out!

Quick Shout-Outs:

  • Congratulations are in order to G. Willow Wilson for her prose novel debut Alif the Unseen being longlisted for the Orange Women’s Prize for Fiction! A good reminder to check it out, and maybe also pick up her first graphic novel Cairo, her Vertigo series Air, or her YA fantasy GN Mystic!
  • Cate Blanchett could be bringing New Yorker cartoonist Marisa Acocella Marchetto’s Cancer Vixen to HBO! She’d be playing Marchetto herself and co-producing as well.
  • Over on CBR, Josie Campbell conducted a fantastic interview with Trina Robbins and Joyce Farmer about the early days of women’s underground comix.

Bonus Art Thing:

Tonight I’m having a bunch of friends over to watch Skyfall and possibly Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace if a) they want to stay that long and b) I can convince them that QoS is actually pretty good if your watch it right after CR. So have a Kate Beaton-inspired "Ooh Mr. Bond: A Fan Fiction" mash-up.

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(The least accurate part of this comic is Silva’s hair being dark.)

Coming up this weekend is the 10th Annual University of Florida Conference on Comics, the theme of which this year is "A Comic of Her Own". It’s goal is:

…to facilitate this dialog and foster the scholarly exploration of intersections between women’s writing in comics, women represented in comics, and the women who read them.

In other words, everything I care about in life, and I wish I could be there! Keynote speakers include Trina Robbins (of course), Leela Corman, and Megan Kelso.
The program details a number of tantalizing panel topics, ranging from the use of comics for women’s autobiographies to exploring sexual and racial identities of both real and fictional women, from women’s place in the world of webcomics to historical movements and contexts for women’s comics.
One panel of particular interest is Carolynn Calabrese's defense of Moto Hagio's The Heart of Thomas. She noted, as I did, that several male reviewers spent more time critiquing the femininity of the work and the tropes of the genres (genres it defined for the coming generations) without analyzing it in its historical context. Carolynn has informed me that one of the critics whose reviews she and I took issue with has agreed to run her critique after the conference, so watch this space for updates!
If you can make it to Gainesville, Florida this weekend, why not check it out? And report back!

Coming up this weekend is the 10th Annual University of Florida Conference on Comics, the theme of which this year is "A Comic of Her Own". It’s goal is:

…to facilitate this dialog and foster the scholarly exploration of intersections between women’s writing in comics, women represented in comics, and the women who read them.

In other words, everything I care about in life, and I wish I could be there! Keynote speakers include Trina Robbins (of course), Leela Corman, and Megan Kelso.

The program details a number of tantalizing panel topics, ranging from the use of comics for women’s autobiographies to exploring sexual and racial identities of both real and fictional women, from women’s place in the world of webcomics to historical movements and contexts for women’s comics.

One panel of particular interest is Carolynn Calabrese's defense of Moto Hagio's The Heart of Thomas. She noted, as I did, that several male reviewers spent more time critiquing the femininity of the work and the tropes of the genres (genres it defined for the coming generations) without analyzing it in its historical context. Carolynn has informed me that one of the critics whose reviews she and I took issue with has agreed to run her critique after the conference, so watch this space for updates!

If you can make it to Gainesville, Florida this weekend, why not check it out? And report back!

Never Again

Today is Holocaust Remembrance Day, and comics have a long and storied history involving World War II, the Holocaust, and Jewish identity. While Art Spiegelman’s Maus and Michael Chabon’s prose novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay are perhaps the most celebrated explorations of this theme, women’s Holocaust narratives have found their way into comics as well. Here is a selection:

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We Are On Our Own by Miriam Katin. Katin’s memoir recounts her and her mother’s escape from the Nazi invasion of Budapest, faking their deaths and leaving behind everything and everyone they ever knew. She recounts and reflects on the lifelong struggles with faith caused by her experiences with some of the worst of humanity’s actions. She created this memoir, her first comics work, at the age of 63. Her follow-up, Letting It Go, is due out in March.

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I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors by Bernice Eisenstein. Eisenstein is the child of two Polish Jews who settled in Canada after surviving Auschwitz. In her memoir she explores the burden and the strange cachet of being a child of survivors and delves into her own morbid curiosity about her family’s past.

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The Resistance trilogy written by Carla Jablonski, is a YA series about three French siblings who join the Resistance when they take their Jewish friend into hiding after his parents disappear.

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Lily Renée: Escape Artist by Trina Robbins and Anne Timmons. This biography for young readers tells the story of the celebrated Golden Age comics artist from a wealthy Viennese family who were torn apart after the Anschluss before reuniting in New York City with nothing but the clothes on their backs, and how she transmuted her drawing skills into a successful career in comics.

Unfortunately, I am not aware of any comics, by women or men, that deal with the persecution of queer people, Roma/Sinti people, or the disabled. However, I highly recommend the documentary Paragraph 175 about the Nazi persecution of homosexuals.

In addition, I would suggest checking out the Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women traveling exhibit and see if it’s coming near you!

What I’m Thankful For

Thanksgiving is probably my favorite holiday.  While it lacks the costumes of Halloween, the presents of Christmas, and the revelry of New Year’s, my family’s Thanksgiving traditions have been the constant in my life that have meant the most to me every year.  When I first visited Japan, my travelling companion and I discussed the merits of living there. The one negative I came up with?  ”I’d miss Thanksgiving.”  When I lived in London for my junior year of college, I still made a full Thanksgiving dinner for my suitemates (though, due to my ignorance as to exactly how long it takes for a turkey to defrost, was made and eaten on Sunday, and by myself since my suitemates had lost interest in my peculiar American customs at that point).

The food is delicious, the family drawn in from far-flung places, the history is complicated and not always nice, and it’s a time to reflect on what’s good in my life.  And here’s what is:

Trina Robbins - The foremost comics “herstorian”, Trina has been a constant inspiration and mentor to me. Her love and dedication to women in comics is like her religion, and I am very grateful to the groundwork she’s laid when I decided pick up her torch. Very few people could have been as excited as I was when I discovered that Fran Hopper was still alive, and only Trina could surpass me. I look forward to her ultimate history of women in comics, Pretty in Ink, when it comes out next year.

The flourishing of female talent - This year has seen some of my favorite lesser-known talent become superstars.  Fiona Staples, whose art I’ve been loving since her turn on The Secret History of the Authority: Hawskmoor, is killing it month after month on Saga.  Almost nothing would stop me from buying the new Brian K. Vaughan series, but it gives me such hope for the future that even someone like him who could have his pick of superstar artists would rather look for a new voice, and a woman at that.  In addition, Kelly Sue DeConnick, whose writing I’ve loved since her first (Sif and Rescue) one-shots for Marvel back in 2010 has now taken up the challenge of writing not one, but two ongoing series, Captain Marvel and Avengers Assemble, which have been some of the most fun comics I’ve read in a long time. And she’s announced her first creator-owned series, Pretty Deadly, with another artist on my list, Emma Rios.  Rios’s star has risen over the past year due to her work on Spider-Man (including Spider Island tie-in Cloak and Dagger), Doctor Strange: Season One, and a few issues of Captain Marvel! And speaking of Spider-Man artists, let’s not forget the woman who has drawn both Peter Parker and Miles Morales!  Sara Pichelli gave first life to the new Ultimate Spider-Man, and then teamed him up with Peter Parker in the first 616/Ultimate universe crossover, Spider-Men!  Honorable mention must go to IDW Publishing for having such faith in the appeal of female creators that they brought Womanthology back for a new space-themed miniseries.

Sisters doing it for themselves - This is a blatant continuation of the above list. Kate Beaton continues to be wonderful and redefining comics on her own terms just by being herself.  Spike spear-headed the revival of female-friendly, sex-positive anthology Smut Peddler, not only paying the creators, but also getting it into her head to do a horror anthology next (She’s still taking pitches until November 30!).  Raina Telgemeier continues to create comics that appeal to the next generation of female readers (and creators!) with this year’s New York Times bestselling Drama.  And according to my mother, a teacher, Jennifer Holm (with her brother Matthew) are getting an even younger generation with Babymouse.  Amy Reeder rebounded from her dismissal from Batwoman with the charming one-shot Halloween Eve, and after chatting with her at NYCC, I am assured that we will see plenty of new work from her in the coming year. Becky Cloonan, of course, remains Becky Cloonan.

Art books celebrating women in comics - Amanda Conner got two— The Art of Amanda Conner and The DC Comics Sequential Art of Amanda Conner.  Marie Severin got The Mirthful Mistress of Comics. Ramona Fradon's was announced and revealed such heavy hitters as Howard Chaykin and Walt Simonson among her admirers. And I look forward to the forthcoming Definitive Reference to the work of Jeffrey Catherine Jones; I hope we can get a DVD release of the documentary about her life.

Lana Wachowski - Thanks again for getting me into comics. Your speech when receiving the HRC Visibility Award made me laugh and cry, frequently in the same sentence.  Your courage to be yourself is admirable and inspiring.  Now where’s the rest of Doc Frankenstein?!

All of My Readers - All 13,595 of you!  You are all the best reason to get up in the morning. 

Non-comics things I’m grateful for include my almost-1-year-old niece (who is currently toddling around my parents’ kitchen as I type), my gainful employment, my new meds that don’t make me tired all the time, the fact that we’ve been spared a Romney presidency, my new "This Machine Kills Fascists" laptop sticker, and friends who push me to be the best me I can be.

Check out the cover to Pretty in Ink, Trina Robbins’s new
updated and expanded history of American women cartoonists (the one I
sort of helped with by finding out that Golden Age artist Fran Hopper
is still alive! As well as introducing her to the work of Eva Mirabal,
the Taos Pueblo cartoonist from WWII.)  It doesn’t come out until next
August, but you can pre-order
it from Amazon.

With the 1896 publication of Rose O’Neill’s comic strip
The Old Subscriber Calls, in Truth Magazine, American women entered
the field of comics, and they never left it. But, you might not know
that reading most of the comics histories out there. Trina Robbins has
spent the last thirty years recording the accomplishments of a century
of women cartoonists, and Pretty in Ink is her ultimate book, a
revised, updated and rewritten history of women cartoonists, with more
color illustrations than ever before, and with some startling new
discoveries (such as a Native American woman cartoonist from the 1940s
who was also a Corporal in the women’s army, and the revelation that a
cartoonist included in all of Robbins’s previous histories was a man!)
In the pages of Pretty in Ink you’ll find new photos and
correspondence from cartoonists Ethel Hays and Edwina Dumm, and the
true story of Golden Age comic book star Lily Renee, as intriguing as
the comics she drew. Although the comics profession was dominated by
men, there were far more women working in the profession throughout
the 20th century than other histories indicate, and they have
flourished in the 21st. Robbins not only documents the increasing
relevance of women throughout the 20th century, with mainstream
creators such as Ramona Fradon and Dale Messick and alternative
cartoonists such as Lynda Barry, Carol Tyler, and Phoebe Gloeckner,
but the latest generation of women cartoonists—Megan Kelso, Cathy
Malkasian, Linda Medley, and Lilli Carré, among many others. Robbins
is the preeminent historian of women comic artists; forget her
previous histories: Pretty in Ink is her most comprehensive volume to
date.

Check out the cover to Pretty in Ink, Trina Robbins’s new updated and expanded history of American women cartoonists (the one I sort of helped with by finding out that Golden Age artist Fran Hopper is still alive! As well as introducing her to the work of Eva Mirabal, the Taos Pueblo cartoonist from WWII.) It doesn’t come out until next August, but you can pre-order it from Amazon.

With the 1896 publication of Rose O’Neill’s comic strip The Old Subscriber Calls, in Truth Magazine, American women entered the field of comics, and they never left it. But, you might not know that reading most of the comics histories out there. Trina Robbins has spent the last thirty years recording the accomplishments of a century of women cartoonists, and Pretty in Ink is her ultimate book, a revised, updated and rewritten history of women cartoonists, with more color illustrations than ever before, and with some startling new discoveries (such as a Native American woman cartoonist from the 1940s who was also a Corporal in the women’s army, and the revelation that a cartoonist included in all of Robbins’s previous histories was a man!) In the pages of Pretty in Ink you’ll find new photos and correspondence from cartoonists Ethel Hays and Edwina Dumm, and the true story of Golden Age comic book star Lily Renee, as intriguing as the comics she drew. Although the comics profession was dominated by men, there were far more women working in the profession throughout the 20th century than other histories indicate, and they have flourished in the 21st. Robbins not only documents the increasing relevance of women throughout the 20th century, with mainstream creators such as Ramona Fradon and Dale Messick and alternative cartoonists such as Lynda Barry, Carol Tyler, and Phoebe Gloeckner, but the latest generation of women cartoonists—Megan Kelso, Cathy Malkasian, Linda Medley, and Lilli Carré, among many others. Robbins is the preeminent historian of women comic artists; forget her previous histories: Pretty in Ink is her most comprehensive volume to date.
Market Monday
Honey West #7, written by Trina Robbins

"Murder, Forsooth," Part 2. Honey goes undercover in a corset and pushup bra at a Medieval Faire, to find out who’s threatening to kill the May Queen. And when those beauty queens go at it tooth and nail, battling for a prize that could lead to stardom, and when that contest might very well be fixed, woe betide the girl who wins, because her jealous rivals might make sure that it’s adios!

Market Monday

Honey West #7, written by Trina Robbins

"Murder, Forsooth," Part 2. Honey goes undercover in a corset and pushup bra at a Medieval Faire, to find out who’s threatening to kill the May Queen. And when those beauty queens go at it tooth and nail, battling for a prize that could lead to stardom, and when that contest might very well be fixed, woe betide the girl who wins, because her jealous rivals might make sure that it’s adios!

Market Monday
Chicagoland Detective Agency Vol. 4: Big Flush, written by Trina Robbins

Poor Megan-history’s repeating itself. She’s been booted from Stepford Prep, and her father is sending her to visit Pine Lake Academy, a boarding school. This could mean the end of the Chicagoland Detective Agency! Raf and Bradley come along to get a sniff at the new school, but something spooky is knocking around in the pipes, and now it has its hooks in them. Have Raf and Megan really been taken over by a ghost from a hundred years ago? Can Bradley dig up the mystery that’s dogged Pine Lake Academy for a century? What deeply buried dastardly deeds will bubble to the surface?

Market Monday

Chicagoland Detective Agency Vol. 4: Big Flush, written by Trina Robbins

Poor Megan-history’s repeating itself. She’s been booted from Stepford Prep, and her father is sending her to visit Pine Lake Academy, a boarding school. This could mean the end of the Chicagoland Detective Agency! Raf and Bradley come along to get a sniff at the new school, but something spooky is knocking around in the pipes, and now it has its hooks in them. Have Raf and Megan really been taken over by a ghost from a hundred years ago? Can Bradley dig up the mystery that’s dogged Pine Lake Academy for a century? What deeply buried dastardly deeds will bubble to the surface?

This is Golden Age artist Fran Hopper, standing next to a portrait of herself she painted in the 1940s, around the time she was working for the publisher Fiction House.
Trina Robbins just e-mailed this to me—as rediscovering Ms. Hopper alive and well was joint effort between us!—and I still can’t believe how fortunate we are to have a chance to preserve one more small corner of women’s comics history before her memories were lost to us like so many others.
Fiction House comics are all in the public domain, so it’s not too hard to find Ms. Hopper’s work online if you dig around, but here are two stories about adventure heroines Mysta of the Moon and Gale Allen (along with a Lily Renée story) from the Golden Age Comic Book Stories blog.  It’s fun stuff, and Ms. Hopper’s art is capable and strong.

This is Golden Age artist Fran Hopper, standing next to a portrait of herself she painted in the 1940s, around the time she was working for the publisher Fiction House.

Trina Robbins just e-mailed this to me—as rediscovering Ms. Hopper alive and well was joint effort between us!—and I still can’t believe how fortunate we are to have a chance to preserve one more small corner of women’s comics history before her memories were lost to us like so many others.

Fiction House comics are all in the public domain, so it’s not too hard to find Ms. Hopper’s work online if you dig around, but here are two stories about adventure heroines Mysta of the Moon and Gale Allen (along with a Lily Renée story) from the Golden Age Comic Book Stories blog.  It’s fun stuff, and Ms. Hopper’s art is capable and strong.

Market Monday
Honey West #6, written by Trina Robbins

'Murder, Forsooth' is the way Shakespeare might have put it when Honey goes undercover at a Medieval Faire (dressed in a corset and push-up bra!), to find out who's threatening to kill the May Queen. And when those beauty queens go at it tooth and nail - battling for a prize that could lead to stardom, in a contest that might very well be fixed - woe betide the girl who wins, because her jealous rivals might make sure that it's adios, hasta la vista, so long - at the Faire!

Market Monday

Honey West #6, written by Trina Robbins

'Murder, Forsooth' is the way Shakespeare might have put it when Honey goes undercover at a Medieval Faire (dressed in a corset and push-up bra!), to find out who's threatening to kill the May Queen. And when those beauty queens go at it tooth and nail - battling for a prize that could lead to stardom, in a contest that might very well be fixed - woe betide the girl who wins, because her jealous rivals might make sure that it's adios, hasta la vista, so long - at the Faire!

This Week’s Events
Featuring: Laydeez Do Comics 1st San Francisco Chapter Meeting
Tonight! at the Cartoon Art Museum in San Francisco, Trina Robbins, along with Maureen Burdock and Heather Plunkett, are bringing one of the top 10 literary events of London stateside.
While there was a “pop-up” meeting in New York City last week, this San Francisco meeting is intended to be the first of a monthly ongoing US presence.  And who better to launch such a group than comics “herstorian” Trina Robbins!  Trina will be giving one of her excellent presentations on women cartoonists over the years, and I am envious of everyone who has the chance to go! (7PM - 9PM PST).
Other Events
Tuesday, April 10
London: Simone Lia will be launching her new book Please God, Find Me a Husband! at Gosh! Comics tonight from 6:30PM GMT on.  There will be champagne!
NYC: Molly Crabapple will be discussing her latest art endeavor, A Week in Hell, with Sarah Jaffe at McNally Jackson Books at 7PM EST.
Tuesday-Friday, April 10-13
Hamburg, Germany: Hamburger Graphic Novel Days in Literaturhaus Hamburg will have panels with such European luminaries as Ulli Lust, Line Hoven, and Posy Simmonds
Wednesday, April 11
Chicago: Jenny Frison and other members of Four Star Studios are going to be at the Apple Store discussing the role of technology in both creating and distributing comics (7PM CST)
Calgary: Fiona Staples signing at Alpha Comics, 4pm – 8pm MST
Thursday, April 12
San Francisco: Leela Corman will be discussing and signing Unterzakhn, at the Cartoon Art Museum. 7PM - 9PM PST.

Friday-Sunday, April 13-15



Chicago: C2E2 at McCormick Place North Hall. Guests include Gail Simone, Amanda Conner, Jenny Frison, Jill Thompson, Katie Cook, and Lora Innes. Artist’s Alley includes Amanda Rachels, Amy Chu, Georgia Lee, Amy Mebberson, Anina Bennett, Ashley Riot, E.J. Barnes, Enrica Jang, Gabriela Sepulveda, Janet Lee, Jean Kang, Katie Shanahan, Rachelle Rosenberg, Sara Richard, Sasha Yosselani, Serena Guerra, Sho Murase, and Stephanie Hans. Womanthology Panel on Saturday with Candice Reilly, Jean Kang, Jessica Daniels, Lauren Burke, Raven Moore, and Stephanie Hans.
Friday-Saturday, April 13 – 14
Williamsport, PA: Wildcat Comic Con at the Pennsylvania College of Technology, featuring M.K. Reed, Joan Hilty, Tania Del Rio, Tracy White, yuumei, and Kambrea Pratt.
Saturday-Sunday, April 14–15
Toronto: Wizard World Toronto Comic Con at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, featuring Agnes Garbowska, Andrea Grant, Renee Witterstaetter, Sanya Anwar, Cris Delara, Geneviève Farley-Tremblay, Sabrina Geraats, Emily Ragozzino, Mina Sanwald, Rebecca Slack, and Mara Sternberg
Saturday, April 14
Bellingham MA: Caitlín R. Kiernan will be signing the first issue of her new series, Alabaster: Wolves, at Friendly Neighborhood Comics. 12PM – 2PM EST
Monday, April 16
Gainesville, FL: Leela Corman at Barnes & Noble, signing Unterzakhn.
If you go to any of these events, please feel free submit pictures!

This Week’s Events

Featuring: Laydeez Do Comics 1st San Francisco Chapter Meeting

Tonight! at the Cartoon Art Museum in San Francisco, Trina Robbins, along with Maureen Burdock and Heather Plunkett, are bringing one of the top 10 literary events of London stateside.

While there was a “pop-up” meeting in New York City last week, this San Francisco meeting is intended to be the first of a monthly ongoing US presence.  And who better to launch such a group than comics “herstorian” Trina Robbins!  Trina will be giving one of her excellent presentations on women cartoonists over the years, and I am envious of everyone who has the chance to go! (7PM - 9PM PST).

Other Events

Tuesday, April 10

Tuesday-Friday, April 10-13

Wednesday, April 11

Thursday, April 12

Friday-Sunday, April 13-15
  • Chicago: C2E2 at McCormick Place North Hall. Guests include Gail Simone, Amanda Conner, Jenny Frison, Jill Thompson, Katie Cook, and Lora Innes. Artist’s Alley includes Amanda Rachels, Amy Chu, Georgia Lee, Amy Mebberson, Anina Bennett, Ashley Riot, E.J. Barnes, Enrica Jang, Gabriela Sepulveda, Janet Lee, Jean Kang, Katie Shanahan, Rachelle Rosenberg, Sara Richard, Sasha Yosselani, Serena Guerra, Sho Murase, and Stephanie Hans. Womanthology Panel on Saturday with Candice Reilly, Jean Kang, Jessica Daniels, Lauren Burke, Raven Moore, and Stephanie Hans.
Friday-Saturday, April 13 – 14

Saturday-Sunday, April 14–15

Saturday, April 14

Monday, April 16

If you go to any of these events, please feel free submit pictures!

Featuring Trina Robbins, Mariah Huehner, Nicole Sixx, Fiona Staples, and Bonnie Burton—

womanthology:

Here’s Part One of our panel at Image Expo!

(via shesawtheblog)

Trina Robbins

phenomenalpeople:

Cartoonist & Comics “Herstorian” - A constant champion for women’s voices in comics and graphic novels, from founding “Wimmen’s Comix” anthology series in the 1970s, to her groundbreaking historical research, preserving the historical legacy of women in the comics field from the dawn of the medium to the 21st century.

This is a celebration of phenomenal women. Who inspires you? Share your story about her here or at #phenomenalpeople.

(Trina was my submission!)

Reviewsy Bits

Reviews for Womanthology are starting to pour in, including from Word of the Nerd Online.com and DCWKA. And contributors Ming Doyle, Chrissie Zullo, and Janet Lee take part in a roundtable discussion on the Acme Wave Projector podcast.

Spandexless looks at Becky Cloonan and Brian Wood’s Conan the Barbarian #1

BleedingCool’s resident Gendercrucher, Tim Hanley, explains why after giving Comic Book Men a second chance, he’s not giving them a third.

Girls Read Comics Too glows about Katie and Steve Shanahan’s Silly Kingdom.

Robot6 is a little disappointed in Lily Renee: Escape Artist, but not because they found the subject lacking!

Jenn Manley Lee’s Dicebox has its first print volume out, and ComicsAlliance is happy to tell you about it. And so is the Comics Journal.

The good reviews keep rolling in for Faith Erin Hicks’s Friends with Boys, this time from GeekMom.

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