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A week ago at the Eisner Awards, Trina Robbins was inducted into the Will Eisner Hall of Fame. She brought the number of women in the Hall of Fame up to four (out of 128). Hers was the last name announced, and I had already braced myself for disappointment when Sergio Aragonés said that the final inductee was “the most deserving” and called her name.
I didn’t need a legend like Aragonés to tell me that, but I’m happy he agrees. Because here’s what Trina Robbins’s induction into the Hall of Fame means: Women matter to comics.
Trina edited the first all-women’s comics anthology, It Ain’t Me Babe, co-founded the ongoing Wimmen’s Comix (which launched careers such as Melinda Gebbie and Roberta Gregory), and dug through the forgotten parts of comics history to find such lost treasures as Nell Brinkley, Fran Hopper, and Lily Renée; she has written three editions of the history of women in comics, with her definitive volume coming out later this year. Throughout the ’80s and ’90s, she was a gadfly on the comics industry, pressing them to produce more books for girls, leading to such efforts as the Marvel-published Misty and Barbie series (the latter of which had an almost-completely female creative staff and was an early showcase of Amanda Conner’s art), the DC-published Legend of Wonder Woman and Wonder Woman: The Once and Future Story, and her own superhero creation (with artist Anne Timmons) GoGirl! Even this year, parallel to San Diego Comic-Con itself, she curated an exhibit on women in comics for the Women’s Museum of California. This blog and the Women in Comics Wiki would be the poorer without her. Trina Robbins’s name is synonymous with “women in comics”.
And the Eisner judges inducted Trina Robbins into the Hall of Fame, alongside Jack Kirby, Stan Lee, Moëbius, Osamu Tezuka, and everyone from EC Comics. Trina Robbins is as important and as valuable to comics as these men because women are important to comics. Their talent and contributions are often ignored, forgotten, or diminished, and Trina Robbins was the first to put up a fight against such obscurity, not just for herself, but for all women who had ever worked in comics.
We can hope that the gates are now flung fully open for the lost women of comics history to receive their due and bring more parity to the Hall of Fame. But the future is most certainly bright, because after the awards ceremony was over—after Hope Larson, Becky Cloonan, and the Fiona Staples-drawn Saga took home their statues—Trina said to me, “Well, I’m glad I gave up drawing, because I could never compete with all the amazing women artists working today.”

A week ago at the Eisner Awards, Trina Robbins was inducted into the Will Eisner Hall of Fame. She brought the number of women in the Hall of Fame up to four (out of 128). Hers was the last name announced, and I had already braced myself for disappointment when Sergio Aragonés said that the final inductee was “the most deserving” and called her name.

I didn’t need a legend like Aragonés to tell me that, but I’m happy he agrees. Because here’s what Trina Robbins’s induction into the Hall of Fame means: Women matter to comics.

Trina edited the first all-women’s comics anthology, It Ain’t Me Babe, co-founded the ongoing Wimmen’s Comix (which launched careers such as Melinda Gebbie and Roberta Gregory), and dug through the forgotten parts of comics history to find such lost treasures as Nell Brinkley, Fran Hopper, and Lily Renée; she has written three editions of the history of women in comics, with her definitive volume coming out later this year. Throughout the ’80s and ’90s, she was a gadfly on the comics industry, pressing them to produce more books for girls, leading to such efforts as the Marvel-published Misty and Barbie series (the latter of which had an almost-completely female creative staff and was an early showcase of Amanda Conner’s art), the DC-published Legend of Wonder Woman and Wonder Woman: The Once and Future Story, and her own superhero creation (with artist Anne Timmons) GoGirl! Even this year, parallel to San Diego Comic-Con itself, she curated an exhibit on women in comics for the Women’s Museum of California. This blog and the Women in Comics Wiki would be the poorer without her. Trina Robbins’s name is synonymous with “women in comics”.

And the Eisner judges inducted Trina Robbins into the Hall of Fame, alongside Jack Kirby, Stan Lee, Moëbius, Osamu Tezuka, and everyone from EC Comics. Trina Robbins is as important and as valuable to comics as these men because women are important to comics. Their talent and contributions are often ignored, forgotten, or diminished, and Trina Robbins was the first to put up a fight against such obscurity, not just for herself, but for all women who had ever worked in comics.

We can hope that the gates are now flung fully open for the lost women of comics history to receive their due and bring more parity to the Hall of Fame. But the future is most certainly bright, because after the awards ceremony was over—after Hope Larson, Becky Cloonan, and the Fiona Staples-drawn Saga took home their statues—Trina said to me, “Well, I’m glad I gave up drawing, because I could never compete with all the amazing women artists working today.”

Words of comfort for those lamenting you’re not at Comic-Con

All the cool news, people, and other exclusives you’re salivating over? If you were actually here, you wouldn’t be aware of 95% of it. I for one am not looking forward to a week or more of finding out about cool stuff I missed and whining, “But I was even there!”

Things to Do at San Diego (not) Comic Con

Maybe you live near enough to San Diego, but didn’t get passes. Or maybe you only got passes for certain days but you’re still in town. What is there for you to do? Loads! 

Wednesday

9pm-12am: #Nerdioke at McFadden’s, hosted by Erin and Angie of The Nerdy Girls blog, starting right after Preview Night wraps, and where I will most likely be. They have pictures of last year’s Nerdioke over at the link, and it looks like a blast! Free, 21+

Thursday

7:30-8:30pm: "Wonder Women: On Paper and Off" panel discussion at the Women’s Museum of California. In conjunction with an exhibit running at the museum until September, Trina Robbins, Ramona Fradon, Mary Fleener, and Carol Lay “will share their experiences of working in the comic industry. Learn about the obstacles these women faced in the comic world as well as the amazing art work they have brought to life.” Free.

Saturday

7pm: Geek Girl Supergroup featuring Molly Lewis, Marian Call, and The Doubleclicks at Rebecca’s Coffeehouse, $10 suggested donation

All Days

All times: Felicia Day’s Geek & Sundry will be running a parallel event at Jolt’n’Joes on 4th Ave and J Street. They will be making announcements, gaming, and holding meet-n-greets with Felicia herself. Free

Women Among the Eisner Nominees

In under two weeks at San Diego Comic Con, the 2013 Eisner Awards will be announced. And while I can’t say if this is the first time it’s happened, there is at least one woman nominated in most categories. The exceptions are for the most part based in the distant past of gender disparity in comics (Best Archival Collection/Project - Strips and Comic Books), a dearth of translated European material (Best U.S. Edition of International Material)

By far, women dominate the Early Readers award, which is very enheartening with regards to acclimating the youngest generation to the ubiquity of women in comics

There are still some strange oversights: no nominations for Fiona Staples as an artist, for Amanda Conner at all, and only one female colorist nominated when Jordie Bellaire, Bettie Breitweiser, Rachelle Rosenberg, Laura Martin, and Laura Allred have all worked regularly.

Still, it’s an impressive show of recognition for women in comics, and hopefully the sign of a regular upward trend. And I’m personally excited to see that Shelli Paroline, my fellow Boston Comics Roundtable member, nominated multiple times for her work on Adventure Time!

The full list of female nominees are under the cut.

Read More

My SDCC Panel Schedule

As expected, both of my panels are on Thursday the 18th, though the participants lists are not 100% accurate— I’m not listed on the Gender in Comic Books panel (while Kelly Sue DeConnick is, which she denies), but the times and rooms are all that you need to worry about!

My blogging panel conflicts with the Hannibal panel, though! So don’t forget to record it for me!

1:00pm - Room 28DE

Gender in Comic Books

Ball State University professor Christina Blanch moderates a sincere discussion on the topic of gender in comics with Mark Waid (Daredevil, Insufferable, Irredeemable), Kelly Sue DeConnick (Captain Marvel, Avengers Academy), Grace Randolph (Supurbia), Meredith Gran (Octopus Pie), and George Pérez (The Brave and The Bold).

7:00pm - Room 23ABC

Family Feud: The Comics Blogging Panel

With the 24-hour news cycle turning into a 24-minute news cycle, fans are still getting their comics news from the top news sites and blogs out there. Join moderator Tom Spurgeon in a no-holds-barred discussion with comics journalists on how they make-and break-the news, the ethics of journalism, the death of blogging, the uses of social media, and ways you can join in on the fun. With Spurgeon (The Comics Reporter), Heidi MacDonald (The Beat), Tony Isabella (Tony’s Tips), Alexa Dickman (Ladies Making Comix), Rich Johnston (Bleeding Cool), and special surprises!

Jill Thompson talks with Previews World at SDCC about Scary Godmother, and her Kickstarter plans for dolls and plushes!

Margaret Atwood at SDCC, rocking that hat (with David Mack)

Margaret Atwood at SDCC, rocking that hat (with David Mack)

I met and saw and talked to a lot of young women working in comics, really impressive young women.
Tom Spurgeon, on the floor of SDCC.
Brian K. Vaughn introduced his new ongoing project called SAGA with artist Fiona Staples. He described the projects as “Epic,” and added, “it’s about a young family surviving galactic war.”
Newsarama.com : SDCC 2011: Creator-Owned Comics
Check out pages from Torn, Nicola Scott’s new creator-owned graphic novel written by Andrew Constant with a sequence drawn by Joh James.
The story is a new take on the werewolf myth, where it’s the wolf who turns in to a man.  Check out the pages— it’s gloriously dark stuff!

Check out pages from Torn, Nicola Scott’s new creator-owned graphic novel written by Andrew Constant with a sequence drawn by Joh James.

The story is a new take on the werewolf myth, where it’s the wolf who turns in to a man.  Check out the pages— it’s gloriously dark stuff!

Help Me Cover SDCC!

One of the troubles with having such a specified blog is that the panels and such I really want to cover are rarely among the first, if ever, covered on the other comics news sites.  So, if you find coverage of the following panels (or even are there and went to them), please point me in its direction, or send me a few words about them in my Ask box.  

Thursday:

Friday

Saturday

  • CBLDF Master Session: Camilla d’Errico
  • Comics Arts Conference Session #12: Poster Session - Superhero Group and Gender Group
  • Spotlight on Walter and Louise Simonson

Sunday

I will update this post with links and such as they come in or I find them.  Thanks for your help!

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