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Posts tagged "Marguerite Abouet"
Market Monday
Aya: Love in Yop City TP, written by Marguerite Abouet

Aya: Love in Yop City comprises the final three chapters of the Aya story, episodes never before seen in English. When a professor tries to take advantage of Aya, her plans to become a doctor are seriously shaken, and she vows to take revenge on the lecherous man. With a little help from the tight-knit community of Yopougon, Aya comes through these trials stronger than ever. This second volume of the complete Aya includes unique appendices: recipes, guides to understanding Ivorian slang, street sketches, and concluding remarks from Marguerite Abouet explaining history and social milieu.

Market Monday

Aya: Love in Yop City TP, written by Marguerite Abouet

Aya: Love in Yop City comprises the final three chapters of the Aya story, episodes never before seen in English. When a professor tries to take advantage of Aya, her plans to become a doctor are seriously shaken, and she vows to take revenge on the lecherous man. With a little help from the tight-knit community of Yopougon, Aya comes through these trials stronger than ever. This second volume of the complete Aya includes unique appendices: recipes, guides to understanding Ivorian slang, street sketches, and concluding remarks from Marguerite Abouet explaining history and social milieu.

Market Monday
Aya: Life In Yop City, written by Marguerite Abouet (Amazon mirror)

Ivory Coast, 1978. It’s a golden time, and the nation, an oasis of affluence and stability in West Africa, seems fueled by something wondrous. Aya is loosely based upon Marguerite Abouet’s youth in Yop City. It is the story of the studious and clear-sighted 19-year old Aya, her easy-going friends Adjoua and Bintou, and their meddling relatives and neighbors. It’s wryly funny, breezy account of the simple pleasures and private troubles of everyday life in Yop City. This reworked edition offers readers the chance to immerse themselves in the lively world of Aya and her friends, bringing together the first three volumes of the series in Book One. Drawn & Quarterly will release volumes four through six of the original French series (as yet unpublished in English) in Book Two.

Market Monday

Aya: Life In Yop City, written by Marguerite Abouet (Amazon mirror)

Ivory Coast, 1978. It’s a golden time, and the nation, an oasis of affluence and stability in West Africa, seems fueled by something wondrous. Aya is loosely based upon Marguerite Abouet’s youth in Yop City. It is the story of the studious and clear-sighted 19-year old Aya, her easy-going friends Adjoua and Bintou, and their meddling relatives and neighbors. It’s wryly funny, breezy account of the simple pleasures and private troubles of everyday life in Yop City. This reworked edition offers readers the chance to immerse themselves in the lively world of Aya and her friends, bringing together the first three volumes of the series in Book One. Drawn & Quarterly will release volumes four through six of the original French series (as yet unpublished in English) in Book Two.


Marguerite Abouet and Clement Oubrerie‘s comics series about Aya of Yopougon tells the story of a nineteen year girl living in a working class town on the Ivory Coast. The strips are set in the 70s, and are reputed for having a strong sense of time and place, even some political acuity, all entwined with a charming and imaginative romantic comedy storyline.
A film is currently in production, based upon the first of the comics, and directed by Abouet and Oubrerie. Today, the first official image has appeared on Oubrerie’s blog. (via Bleeding Cool)

Marguerite Abouet and Clement Oubrerie‘s comics series about Aya of Yopougon tells the story of a nineteen year girl living in a working class town on the Ivory Coast. The strips are set in the 70s, and are reputed for having a strong sense of time and place, even some political acuity, all entwined with a charming and imaginative romantic comedy storyline.

A film is currently in production, based upon the first of the comics, and directed by Abouet and Oubrerie. Today, the first official image has appeared on Oubrerie’s blog. (via Bleeding Cool)

ProFile Friday
Marguerite Abouet (b. 1971) is an Ivorian-French creator best known for her graphic novel series Aya.
Abouet was born in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. At the age of twelve, Abouet and her brother moved to France with their great uncle. She currently resides in Romainville, a suburb just outside of Paris, with her husband, illustrator Clément Oubrerie (who illustrates her graphic concepts), and their young son.
She worked as a legal assistant in Paris while she wrote her first graphic novel, Aya. Before writing Aya, Abouet tried to write novels for young people, but she gave up in frustration with what she perceived to be the constraints put on the genre by the publishers. She has also quit her job as a legal assistant to concentrate on writing full time, including her two follow up graphic novels to Aya (Aya of Yop City and Aya: The Secrets Come Out). Aya is Abouet’s first published work. It is also her first venture into graphic novels, as well as a collaborative effort with her husband who used Aya as his first illustrating job in graphic novels.
She was influenced to do a graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi, the author of Persepolis. It also emerged from her desire to show an Africa with a focus on issues other than war and famine, which is typically what the Western media focus on in portraying Africa. Her characters go to school, trudge off to work, plan for the future and allow themselves to be ensnared in domestic entanglements on the Ivory Coast the same way they do everywhere else.
Abouet denies that Aya is autobiographical, except in the sense that it is the Côte d’Ivoire that she is familiar with. The characters are based on people she knew growing up, but the situations are purely fictional.
Aya won the 2006 Angoulême International Comics Festival Prize for First Comic Book and has sold over 200,000 copies in France. The Canadian publisher Drawn and Quarterly distributed the English language version in the United States. They have printed over 10,000 copies in the U.S., which is a significant number for a first time graphic novel in the United States. Abouet persuaded her French publisher to sell cheaper, soft-cover copies of the graphic novel in her native Côte d’Ivoire.  An animated film is set to be released in 2011.

ProFile Friday

Marguerite Abouet (b. 1971) is an Ivorian-French creator best known for her graphic novel series Aya.

Abouet was born in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. At the age of twelve, Abouet and her brother moved to France with their great uncle. She currently resides in Romainville, a suburb just outside of Paris, with her husband, illustrator Clément Oubrerie (who illustrates her graphic concepts), and their young son.

She worked as a legal assistant in Paris while she wrote her first graphic novel, Aya. Before writing Aya, Abouet tried to write novels for young people, but she gave up in frustration with what she perceived to be the constraints put on the genre by the publishers. She has also quit her job as a legal assistant to concentrate on writing full time, including her two follow up graphic novels to Aya (Aya of Yop City and Aya: The Secrets Come Out). Aya is Abouet’s first published work. It is also her first venture into graphic novels, as well as a collaborative effort with her husband who used Aya as his first illustrating job in graphic novels.

She was influenced to do a graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi, the author of Persepolis. It also emerged from her desire to show an Africa with a focus on issues other than war and famine, which is typically what the Western media focus on in portraying Africa. Her characters go to school, trudge off to work, plan for the future and allow themselves to be ensnared in domestic entanglements on the Ivory Coast the same way they do everywhere else.

Abouet denies that Aya is autobiographical, except in the sense that it is the Côte d’Ivoire that she is familiar with. The characters are based on people she knew growing up, but the situations are purely fictional.

Aya won the 2006 Angoulême International Comics Festival Prize for First Comic Book and has sold over 200,000 copies in France. The Canadian publisher Drawn and Quarterly distributed the English language version in the United States. They have printed over 10,000 copies in the U.S., which is a significant number for a first time graphic novel in the United States. Abouet persuaded her French publisher to sell cheaper, soft-cover copies of the graphic novel in her native Côte d’Ivoire. An animated film is set to be released in 2011.

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