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Weekly Roundup of cool news: March 10-16, 2013

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The arts scene is flourishing in post-revolution Egypt and comics are no exception! A new organization, Mazg (which means incorporation or blending), seeks to teach comics creation and establish a proper comics industry in Egypt. It was founded by four women, Mona Al-Masry, Naglaa Koora, Sara Al-Masry and Nevien Adel, who have “different experiences in cultural administration, human rights activism and art”. Their goals include bringing comics workshops to the provinces, translations of foreign comics, and establish an Egyptian comics festival.

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In case you were wondering, above is the panel of Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis that got it yanked from a 7th grade curriculum in Chicago Public Schools. The Chicago-area ALA has released a statement.

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This week was a good week for crowdfunding! (If you’re trying to make a movie based on a recentish cult TV show, anyway). Two comics fundraisers that caught my eye. Graham Cracker Comics store, also in Chicago, hosts a regular Ladies’ Night, and several of its regulars have put together an anthology! They’re trying to raise $1000, and are currently over a quarter of the way there. A mere $2 gets you a digital copy and $10 gets you a physical copy as well! Also, Every/Body, a follow-up to the pro-marriage equality anthology Little Heart, is an anthology discussing body and gender, and they are just $200 shy of hitting their $2500 goal!

Also, just a reminder that I have a Crowdfunding board on Pinterest, with many other worth projects to check out!

Quick Shout-Outs:

  • Congratulations are in order to G. Willow Wilson for her prose novel debut Alif the Unseen being longlisted for the Orange Women’s Prize for Fiction! A good reminder to check it out, and maybe also pick up her first graphic novel Cairo, her Vertigo series Air, or her YA fantasy GN Mystic!
  • Cate Blanchett could be bringing New Yorker cartoonist Marisa Acocella Marchetto’s Cancer Vixen to HBO! She’d be playing Marchetto herself and co-producing as well.
  • Over on CBR, Josie Campbell conducted a fantastic interview with Trina Robbins and Joyce Farmer about the early days of women’s underground comix.

Bonus Art Thing:

Tonight I’m having a bunch of friends over to watch Skyfall and possibly Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace if a) they want to stay that long and b) I can convince them that QoS is actually pretty good if your watch it right after CR. So have a Kate Beaton-inspired "Ooh Mr. Bond: A Fan Fiction" mash-up.

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(The least accurate part of this comic is Silva’s hair being dark.)

Market Monday
The Best American Comics 2012 HC, edited by Françoise Mouly, series co-edited by Jessica Abel, includes work by Joyce Farmer, Renée French, Sarah Glidden, Nora Krug, Leanne Shapton, and Sarah Varon

The Best American Comics showcases the work of both established and up-and-coming contributers from 2012. Guest Editor Françoise Mouly - long-time art editor at The New Yorker and founder of the graphic anthologies RAW - has culled the best pieces from graphic novels, pamphlet comics, newspapers, magazines, minicomics, and the Web to create a stunning installment, complete this year with a selection of pieces devoted to kids and contributions from Charles Burns, Chester Brown, and Joyce Farmer.

Market Monday

The Best American Comics 2012 HC, edited by Françoise Mouly, series co-edited by Jessica Abel, includes work by Joyce Farmer, Renée French, Sarah Glidden, Nora Krug, Leanne Shapton, and Sarah Varon

The Best American Comics showcases the work of both established and up-and-coming contributers from 2012. Guest Editor Françoise Mouly - long-time art editor at The New Yorker and founder of the graphic anthologies RAW - has culled the best pieces from graphic novels, pamphlet comics, newspapers, magazines, minicomics, and the Web to create a stunning installment, complete this year with a selection of pieces devoted to kids and contributions from Charles Burns, Chester Brown, and Joyce Farmer.

Market Monday
No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics, includes work by Alison Bechdel, Paige Braddock, Jennifer Camper, Diane DiMassa, Kris Dresen, Leslie Ewing, Joyce Farmer, Ellen Forney, Isabel Franc, Leanne Franson, Roberta Gregory, Michelle Grubin, Joan Hilty, Gina Kamentsky, Lee Marrs, Susanna Martín, Carrie McNinch, Erika Moen, Annie Murphy, MariNaomi, Andrea Natalie, Trina Robbins, Roxxie, Joey Alison Sayers, Ariel Schrag, Christine Smith, and Mary Wings

Queer cartooning encompasses some of the best and most interesting comics of the last four decades, with creators tackling complex issues of identity and a changing society with intelligence, humor, and imagination. This book celebrates this vibrant artistic underground by gathering together a collection of excellent stories that can be enjoyed by all.
No Straight Lines showcases major names such as Alison Bechdel (whose book Fun Home was named Time Magazine’s 2006 Book of the Year), Howard Cruse (whose groundbreaking Stuck Rubber Baby is now back in print), and Ralf Koenig (one of Europe’s most popular cartoonists), as well as high-profile, cross-over creators who have dabbled in LGBT cartooning, like legendary NYC artist David Wojnarowicz and media darling and advice columnist Dan Savage. No Straight Lines also spotlights many talented creators who never made it out of the queer comics ghetto, but produced amazing work that deserves wider attention.
Until recently, queer cartooning existed in a parallel universe to the rest of comics, appearing only in gay newspapers and gay bookstores and not in comic book stores, mainstream bookstores or newspapers. The insular nature of the world of queer cartooning, however, created a fascinating artistic scene. LGBT comics have been an uncensored, internal conversation within the queer community, and thus provide a unique window into the hopes, fears, and fantasies of queer people for the last four decades.
These comics have forged their aesthetics from the influences of underground comix, gay erotic art, punk zines, and the biting commentaries of drag queens, bull dykes, and other marginalized queers. They have analyzed their own communities, and their relationship with the broader society. They are smart, funny, and profound. No Straight Lines will be heralded by people interested in comics history, and people invested in LGBT culture will embrace it as a unique and invaluable collection.

Preview at Amazon link

Market Monday

No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics, includes work by Alison Bechdel, Paige Braddock, Jennifer Camper, Diane DiMassa, Kris Dresen, Leslie Ewing, Joyce Farmer, Ellen Forney, Isabel Franc, Leanne Franson, Roberta Gregory, Michelle Grubin, Joan Hilty, Gina Kamentsky, Lee Marrs, Susanna Martín, Carrie McNinch, Erika Moen, Annie Murphy, MariNaomi, Andrea Natalie, Trina Robbins, Roxxie, Joey Alison Sayers, Ariel Schrag, Christine Smith, and Mary Wings

Queer cartooning encompasses some of the best and most interesting comics of the last four decades, with creators tackling complex issues of identity and a changing society with intelligence, humor, and imagination. This book celebrates this vibrant artistic underground by gathering together a collection of excellent stories that can be enjoyed by all.

No Straight Lines showcases major names such as Alison Bechdel (whose book Fun Home was named Time Magazine’s 2006 Book of the Year), Howard Cruse (whose groundbreaking Stuck Rubber Baby is now back in print), and Ralf Koenig (one of Europe’s most popular cartoonists), as well as high-profile, cross-over creators who have dabbled in LGBT cartooning, like legendary NYC artist David Wojnarowicz and media darling and advice columnist Dan Savage. No Straight Lines also spotlights many talented creators who never made it out of the queer comics ghetto, but produced amazing work that deserves wider attention.

Until recently, queer cartooning existed in a parallel universe to the rest of comics, appearing only in gay newspapers and gay bookstores and not in comic book stores, mainstream bookstores or newspapers. The insular nature of the world of queer cartooning, however, created a fascinating artistic scene. LGBT comics have been an uncensored, internal conversation within the queer community, and thus provide a unique window into the hopes, fears, and fantasies of queer people for the last four decades.

These comics have forged their aesthetics from the influences of underground comix, gay erotic art, punk zines, and the biting commentaries of drag queens, bull dykes, and other marginalized queers. They have analyzed their own communities, and their relationship with the broader society. They are smart, funny, and profound. No Straight Lines will be heralded by people interested in comics history, and people invested in LGBT culture will embrace it as a unique and invaluable collection.

Preview at Amazon link

fantagraphics:

This is happening!

w00t, underground comix sale!  Including Aline Kominsky-Crumb’s Love That Bunch (HC and SC), Joyce Farmer’s Special Exits (signed!), and pre-orders of Diane Noomin’s Glitz-2-Go!

fantagraphics:

This is happening!

w00t, underground comix sale!  Including Aline Kominsky-Crumb’s Love That Bunch (HC and SC), Joyce Farmer’s Special Exits (signed!), and pre-orders of Diane Noomin’s Glitz-2-Go!

Association Artémisia, the French organization for the promotion of comics/BD by women, recently announced their selection for the 2012 Prix Artémisia, to be awarded January 9th.
Where available, I have given the official English title; otherwise, I provided my own or Google’s translation:

Chloé Cruchaudet: Ida, Candeur et abomination tome 2 (Ida, Candor and Abomination)

Claire Braud: Mambo

Marine Blandin: Fables nautiques (Water Fables)

Sybilline et Natacha Sicaud, Sous l’entonnoir (Under the Funnel)

Karine Bernadou, Canopée (Canopy)

Sarah Glidden: How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less

Lucie Lomovà: Les Sauvages  (The Savages)

Joyce Farmer: Special Exits

Anke Feuchtenberger & Katrin de Vries: La Putain P jette le gant (W the Whore Throws Down the Gauntlet)

Marion Montaigne: Tu mourras moins bête! (You Will Die Less Stupid!)

Marion Fayolle: L’homme en pièces (Man in Pieces)

Association Artémisia, the French organization for the promotion of comics/BD by women, recently announced their selection for the 2012 Prix Artémisia, to be awarded January 9th.

Where available, I have given the official English title; otherwise, I provided my own or Google’s translation:

Chloé Cruchaudet: Ida, Candeur et abomination tome 2 (Ida, Candor and Abomination)

Claire Braud: Mambo

Marine Blandin: Fables nautiques (Water Fables)

Sybilline et Natacha Sicaud, Sous l’entonnoir (Under the Funnel)

Karine Bernadou, Canopée (Canopy)

Sarah Glidden: How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less

Lucie Lomovà: Les Sauvages  (The Savages)

Joyce Farmer: Special Exits

Anke Feuchtenberger & Katrin de Vries: La Putain P jette le gant (W the Whore Throws Down the Gauntlet)

Marion Montaigne: Tu mourras moins bête! (You Will Die Less Stupid!)

Marion Fayolle: L’homme en pièces (Man in Pieces)

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