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[Insert zombie and/or Frankenstein pun here]

ladiesmakingcomics:

This summer was the third in a row for me that involved moving to a new apartment and starting a new job. The good news is, that’s the last time in the foreseeable future that will happen! The major downside to it is that I am massively behind on my comics reading (Woe!).

So I’ve been mulling over how to get back in the blogging game while also not having much by way of recent commentary. In prepping for reviving this blog, I cleaned up the tags I was tracking on Tumblr, when one of my ancient ideas solved my entire quandary in one fell swoop.

The LMC Book Club was something I tried three apartments ago. We read Cairo by now-Ms. Marvel writer G. Willow Wilson (which is still a phenomenal book and you should read it if you haven’t yet). It was also back when my ADD was undiagnosed, so it kind of trailed off at the end. But now I have actual time management skills and time blocked off on most days to read and/or blog, so what better way to dive back in and get people reading (more) awesome comics by ladies than a book club?

So I’m going to take nominations for the rest of the week for comics written and/or drawn by women. Ideally, I’m looking for graphic novels or collected trades and preferably available in various formats (print, digital, serialized online) so people can read how they’re most comfortable. “In print” would also tend to imply something from the past three years, though that is far from a hard and fast rule. As always, diversity is a plus. But above all, nominations must simply be damn good comics.

Drop the noms in my askbox, and this weekend I’ll put up a poll. Once we have a selection, I’ll put up a schedule to give you time to both obtain and read the book. We’ll probably stretch out discussion over a few weeks and see how that works.

Spread the word! And the tag is #lmcbookclub

For the night crowd ;)

[Insert zombie and/or Frankenstein pun here]

This summer was the third in a row for me that involved moving to a new apartment and starting a new job. The good news is, that’s the last time in the foreseeable future that will happen! The major downside to it is that I am massively behind on my comics reading (Woe!).

So I’ve been mulling over how to get back in the blogging game while also not having much by way of recent commentary. In prepping for reviving this blog, I cleaned up the tags I was tracking on Tumblr, when one of my ancient ideas solved my entire quandary in one fell swoop.

The LMC Book Club was something I tried three apartments ago. We read Cairo by now-Ms. Marvel writer G. Willow Wilson (which is still a phenomenal book and you should read it if you haven’t yet). It was also back when my ADD was undiagnosed, so it kind of trailed off at the end. But now I have actual time management skills and time blocked off on most days to read and/or blog, so what better way to dive back in and get people reading (more) awesome comics by ladies than a book club?

So I’m going to take nominations for the rest of the week for comics written and/or drawn by women. Ideally, I’m looking for graphic novels or collected trades and preferably available in various formats (print, digital, serialized online) so people can read how they’re most comfortable. “In print” would also tend to imply something from the past three years, though that is far from a hard and fast rule. As always, diversity is a plus. But above all, nominations must simply be damn good comics.

Drop the noms in my askbox, and this weekend I’ll put up a poll. Once we have a selection, I’ll put up a schedule to give you time to both obtain and read the book. We’ll probably stretch out discussion over a few weeks and see how that works.

Spread the word! And the tag is #lmcbookclub

Veering into what I like to call “overlap” territory, I’d like to help get the word out about Outwrite DC, an LGBT book fair in Washington DC having its fourth annual event in August. They are still looking for sponsors and exhibitors, and they have assured me comics creators are welcome!
So if you are a comics creator or prose/poetry writer or zinester of LGBT themes, can be in the DC area the first weekend in August, and have $40, you can exhibit at Outwrite DC. Northwest Press is already signed up, so you will be in great company. Also welcome to exhibit are arts-and-crafts creators, preferably of a queer or writerly bent.
If you want to help out even more and/or don’t have anything to shill, you can become a sponsor for as little as $100. If you do have something to shill, sponsors above the $250 level get a complimentary exhibitor’s table.
Hope to see you there!

Veering into what I like to call “overlap” territory, I’d like to help get the word out about Outwrite DC, an LGBT book fair in Washington DC having its fourth annual event in August. They are still looking for sponsors and exhibitors, and they have assured me comics creators are welcome!

So if you are a comics creator or prose/poetry writer or zinester of LGBT themes, can be in the DC area the first weekend in August, and have $40, you can exhibit at Outwrite DC. Northwest Press is already signed up, so you will be in great company. Also welcome to exhibit are arts-and-crafts creators, preferably of a queer or writerly bent.

If you want to help out even more and/or don’t have anything to shill, you can become a sponsor for as little as $100. If you do have something to shill, sponsors above the $250 level get a complimentary exhibitor’s table.

Hope to see you there!

Gail Simone to speak at White House about LGBTQ and PWD in the media

gailsimone:

I am completely stunned and amazed, but this is apparently happening!

I am giving a short speech about LGBTQ and PWD characters in the media at the White House on Thursday. I haven’t had much notice and I spent a full day imagining that it had to be a prank or a terrible mistake, but it is actually going to happen.

I want to thank the literally hundreds of people in those groups who have written to offer support. I wish I could express my appreciation in person. I know I am lucky to have the readership I do. It’s the thing I still can’t believe about this job.

Anyway, I am not an authority on these topics and I think true activists are heroic but are working on a much higher level than I am, so I thought my speech would be about something I actually DO know a little bit about, which would be how things have changed for representation in the media, specifically comics. The progress we have seen, and of course, the long distance we have to go.

So I am posting this thread, for people who are lgbtq or pwd who have a thought they would like me to keep in mind.  Anything you would say if you had the chance at an event like this. I can’t guarantee it will be included, but I want to be a messenger rather than a fake ‘expert,’ if that makes sense.

I have said this many times. The only reason I know ANYTHING about these topics is because people like you right here on Tumblr were kind and patient enough to share your world with me a little bit and I hope to use this opportunity to pay you back.

Thank you.

Your thoughts are MOST WELCOME.

Congrats, Gail! This is amazing.

My two cents as a bisexual who fortunately never felt all that “confused” and always respected myself above anyone else’s opinions: Education and visibility are vital. They don’t have to be major— simply learning the word “bisexual” at the age of 10 and knowing that women like Melissa Etheridge and Ellen DeGeneres existed was enough to keep my head up.

One of the things I came to love about comics fairly quickly was the amount of queer characters I found almost immediately. I went 16 years without seeing any trans people in media. After I started reading comics, I encountered three in two years (Wanda in Sandman, Lord Fanny in the Invisibles, and Mel in American Virgin.) The democratization of webcomics brought dozens of new queer perspectives to me as easily as breathing, that were about more things than just “queer issues”. Bisexuals seemed like they were everywhere. Queer teenagers who were also superheroes? Only in comics.

And this translated in to real life, too. Being able to chat with a new friend about X-Men as a means of entry into talking about queer rights and identity, both to find out where they stood and maybe if they also were… The first Pride parades I marched in were with my comic book store. For most of my young adulthood, my comics community (online and off) doubled as my queer community. When people ask me why I love comics so much, a lot of the time I don’t even think to bring up how queer they are, because to me it’s so ingrained. Whether we’re talking about characters and creators, themes and metaphors, or even just the often “camp” aesthetic, comics have always brought to me the full spectrum of queerness.

What can I say, Wertham was right!

Heroines of the Comics for Drew Friedman’s perusal

I was recently made aware of Drew Friedman’s upcoming Heroes of the Comics, coming out in August, featuring full-color portraits and profiles of important comic book creators from the 1930s through the 1950s. My initial reaction was some delight, because Fantagraphics put up a picture of Lily Renée’s profile, and that’s always good when people remember her. But of course my delight was tempered the more I read on. The table of contents in the preview lists only two other women in addition to Renée, Marie Severin and Ramona Fradon (misspelled ‘Fraden’), out of 84 people. The summary on the back of the book says, “Featuring subjects popular and obscure, men and women, as well as several pioneering African-American artists.” When women make up 3.5% of your list, (and “several” African-Americans = 2 of them), you’re almost better off not trying to pass them off as a selling point of the book.

What makes this list all the more disappointing is that Friedman himself stated at MoCCA Fest that he felt it was important to profile creators overlooked by both fans and people in the industry, specifically citing Bill Finger. Of course, lists like this are always going to cause some kind of debate over inclusions and omissions, and I understand this book isn’t just about introducing people to forgotten creators, but the people who know Bill Finger was the real creator of Batman still vastly outnumber the people who have even heard of Lily Renée.

Bearing all that in mind, here is my list of women who could have been in this book.

Elizabeth Holloway Marston

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Friedman features the team of Superman’s creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, as a single entity (#8), so why is Wonder Woman co-creator William Moulton Marston (#24) all on his own? Elizabeth’s contributions to the creation of Wonder Woman are well-documented. And if you wanted to be thorough, you could include the Marstons’ third partner, Olive Byrne, as the inspiration for Wondy’s metal bracelets!

Virginia Hubbell

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No Golden Age comics history is complete without mentioning #22 on Friedman’s list, Charles Biro and his lurid Crime Does Not Pay. Until recently (with David Hajdu’s The Ten-Cent Plague) however, no one mentioned that most of “Biro’s” stories were actually by a young woman known as “Ginny”. Her colleagues Pete Morisi and Rudy Palais praised her as a superior creator to Biro. Palais even said that “Charlie couldn’t do what she did in a million years.”

Ray Hermann

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Hermann (aka Rae or Ruth) was a publisher, editor, writer, (and possibly penciller and inker) whose career spanned fron 1940 to 1955. Her company, Orbit Publications, was a founding member of the Association of Comic Magazine Publishers, for which she served as Secretary and Board Director. The ACMP was founded in response to the rising anti-comics sentiment in the United States, creating the first Publication Code for policing the content in comics, but comics were not subject to formal review to use their seal of approval, and it was largely ignored, but its Publication Code formed the backbone of the later Comics Code. She was also one of the few “advice columnists” in romance comics who was actually a woman

Helen Meyer

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Whenever comics history discusses Dr. Frederic Wertham and the Kefauver hearings on “juvenile delinquency”, EC publisher Bill Gaines is lionized as the only person in the comics industry who stood up to and demanded to be heard. That, my friends, is what we call a damn lie. Helen Meyer was the publisher of Dell Publications and was instrumental in securing the Disney, Warner Brothers, Little Lulu, and Popeye licenses for Dell’s comics line. What follows is from Meyer’s testimony:

We must give our American children proper credit for their good taste in their support of good comics. What better evidence can we give than facts and figures…Dell’s average comic sale is 800,000 copies per issue. Most crime and horror comic sales are under 250,000 copies. Of the first 25 largest selling magazines on newsstands - this includes Ladies Home Journal, Saturday Evening Post, Life, and so forth ─ 11 titles are Dell comics…With the least amount of titles, or 15 percent of all titles published by the entire industry; Dell can account for a sale of approximately 32 percent, and we don’t publish a crime or horror comic.

Dr. Wertham, for some strange reason, is intent on condemning the entire industry. He refuses to acknowledge that other types of comics are not only published, but are better supported by children than crime and horror comics. I hope that his motivation is not a selfish one in his crusade against comics. Yet, in the extensive research he tells us he has made on comics, why does he ignore the good comics? Dell isn’t alone in publishing good comics. There are numerous outstanding titles published by other publishers, such as Blondie, Archie, Dennis the Menace, and so forth. Why does he feel that he must condemn the entire industry? Could it be that he feels he has a better case against comics by recognizing the bad and ignoring the good?

Meyer was made CEO of Dell Publications in the early 1950s and remained so until its sale to Doubleday in 1976.

Ruth Atkinson

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Either created or co-created the long-running Marvel Comics characters Millie the Model and Patsy Walker. Comics history is cruel to the pioneers of genres that have fallen out of favor, but both Patsy and Millie kept Marvel afloat in the 1950s. Even amid the Marvel superhero revival of the 1960s, Millie the Model comics were still among the top 100 series circulated each year, bringing in almost $220k at its peak that decade in 1965—equal to almost $1.7 million today.

Roberta Strauss Feuerlicht

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Feuerlicht was the Editor-in-Chief of Classics Illustrated as well as an acclaimed historian. She began working at Gilberton, the publishers of Classics Illustrated, as an assistant editor in 1953. By then end of her tenure in 1961, she had been made Editor-in-Chief and created spin-off titles like Classics Illustrated Junior and other non-fiction comics like The World Around Us. She was known around the Gilberton offices as “Roberta the Conqueror”.

Honorable Mentions

  • Ruth Roche: Friedman lists Jerry Iger (#6), who with Will Eisner (#7) founded the Eisner-Iger shop. He leaves out Ruth Roche, his later business partner. Roche started as a writer at the Eisner-Iger studio in 1940. She soon became Iger’s associate editor; later they became business partners, and the studio became the Roche-Iger studio. She stayed with the Roche-Iger studio until it ceased publication in 1961.
  • Marion McDermott was an editor for St. John publications, including one of the first graphic novels ever produced, It Rhymes With Lust. She also edited such titles as Teen-Age Temptations, Teen-Age Romances, Authentic Police Cases, and Fightin’ Marines. Artist Ric Estrada credits her encouragement for helping him develop his style
  • Joan Bacchus. Though her first attributable published comics were in 1966 as part of the Black history series Golden Legacy, it is very likely she contributed, under her maiden name “Cooper”, to 1947’s All-Negro Comics, making her the first African-American woman published in a comic book.
  • Patricia Highsmith. Though best known as a thriller novelist, Highsmith’s only “honest” job her whole life was writing comics for various companies including Timely (Marvel) Comics!
Are you an LGBT creator who could use some money to help you self-publish your comic? Then you might want to check out Prism Comics’s Queer Press Grant, now open for submissions!

Prism Comics offers an annual financial grant to help aspiring LGBT comics creators publish and promote their comics. The Queer Press Grant is funded by donations from readers, established creators with the desire to help those just starting out, and fans who want to see more LGBT stories get published.
“It’s an exciting time for LGBT comics creators.” says Ted Abenheim, president of Prism Comics. “Every day there are new artists and writers creating comics which present the wide diversity of LGBT experience. Great works of serious literary merit, but although the comics industry has begun to embrace LGBT comics, it is still difficult and expensive for independent and aspiring comics creators to get their comics into the hands of readers. The Queer Press Grant helps self-publishing LGBT comics creators accomplish this goal.”

Past winners include Megan Rose Gedris for “YU+ME:dream”, Pam Harrison for “House of Muses”, Tana Ford for “Duck”, Christine Smith for “The Princess”, Blue Deliquanti for “O Human Star”, and Hazel Newlevant for “If This Be Sin”
Go to the Queer Press Grant page for instructions on how to apply. The deadline for proposals is Monday, September 1, 2014. The grant will be awarded at the Alternative Press Expo in San Francisco October 4-5, 2014.
Prism will also be exhibiting at San Diego Comic Con next month, conducting portfolio reviews, presenting panels, and hosting creator signings.

Are you an LGBT creator who could use some money to help you self-publish your comic? Then you might want to check out Prism Comics’s Queer Press Grant, now open for submissions!

Prism Comics offers an annual financial grant to help aspiring LGBT comics creators publish and promote their comics. The Queer Press Grant is funded by donations from readers, established creators with the desire to help those just starting out, and fans who want to see more LGBT stories get published.

“It’s an exciting time for LGBT comics creators.” says Ted Abenheim, president of Prism Comics. “Every day there are new artists and writers creating comics which present the wide diversity of LGBT experience. Great works of serious literary merit, but although the comics industry has begun to embrace LGBT comics, it is still difficult and expensive for independent and aspiring comics creators to get their comics into the hands of readers. The Queer Press Grant helps self-publishing LGBT comics creators accomplish this goal.”

Past winners include Megan Rose Gedris for “YU+ME:dream”, Pam Harrison for “House of Muses”, Tana Ford for “Duck”, Christine Smith for “The Princess”, Blue Deliquanti for “O Human Star”, and Hazel Newlevant for “If This Be Sin

Go to the Queer Press Grant page for instructions on how to apply. The deadline for proposals is Monday, September 1, 2014. The grant will be awarded at the Alternative Press Expo in San Francisco October 4-5, 2014.

Prism will also be exhibiting at San Diego Comic Con next month, conducting portfolio reviews, presenting panels, and hosting creator signings.

j-walter-weatherman replied to your link Shocking* Announcement
please don’t delete the blog, even if you give up on it, because it could still be used as an archive of your posts and stuff

Don’t worry, I think I’m constitutionally incapable of doing anything of the sort. I’m a packrat of both things and ideas (merely looking to my left right now I can see a pair of socks that I got on a Virgin Atlantic flight on my way to study abroad in London, oh, seven years ago. I have never worn these socks and have kept them in the package because they have the logo of the Lord of the Rings stage play that was going on in London at the time.)

If I believe there is the slightest chance that even one other person in the world might be interested in something, I will take great pains to preserve it however I can (anyone want to see some promotional airline socks?). I really should have been a librarian or museum curator or something. Anyway, this blog will probably be up at least as long as I’m alive; even if Tumblr goes down I’ll find some way to save it and post it somewhere else.

Anonymous said: You could schedule a reblog feature of old good posts of yours! I miss that tumblr doesn't allow to make a dashboard of old tumblr posts to enjoy bite after bite.

That’s not a bad idea! I’m still shocked that my last post (the obituary of Barbara Hall) has gotten over 1300 notes and was blue-tagged with the #history tag :O And there are definitely posts that I made early on that I’d like to think could get up there.

Someday when I’m feeling particularly lazy, I’ll comb through the archives and see what I can find.

ProFile Friday: In Memorium

Isabelle Daniel “Barbara” Hall Fiske Calhoun, best known for her work (as Barbara Hall) on “Girl Commandos” and “Pat Parker, War Nurse” during the Golden Age of Comics, died this past Monday, April 28, 2014 at age 94 in a nursing home in White River Junction, Vermont, not far from the Center for Cartoon Studies. Her daughter Ladybelle and son in law Brion were with her for the last days of her life. She died peacefully and without struggle. Drawing and painting remained her main interest in her final days. “Art is prayer,” she frequently said

Hall was born in 1919 into an old Southern family. Her ancestors had fought the British during the Revolutionary War, and later fought on the Southern side in the American Civil War. She studied painting in Los Angeles, moving to New York City in 1940. She showed her portfolio to Harvey Comics in 1941, and was hired to draw the comic “Black Cat”. Her next strip was “Girl Commandos”, about an international team of Nazi-fighting women. This comic was developed from “Pat Parker, War Nurse”, about a “freelance fighter for freedom.” When stationed in India, this nurse recruited a British nurse, an American radio operator, a Soviet photographer, and a Chinese patriot. Hall continued this strip until 1943. Girl Commandos was taken over by Jill Elgin. On January 8, 1946, she married writer and playwright Irving Fiske and became Barbara Hall Fiske.

Hall continued her art career as a tempera and pastel painter. Together with her husband, she began an alternative living group/artists and writers’ colony in Rochester, Vermont, called Quarry Hill. (Later it became known as the Quarry Hill Creative Center.) She and Irving Fiske had two children, Isabella (Ladybelle) and William.

In the Sixties, through her daughter, Ladybelle, she met and became friends with many well-known underground cartoonists, including R. Crumb, Trina Robbins, Kim Deitch, Spain Rodriguez, and others. Ladybelle met Art Spiegelman in 1966 through Trina Robbins and also, concurrently, through a group of Spiegelman’s fellow-students at the State University of New York at Binghamton. In 1978, Ladybelle, Spiegelman, Françoise Mouly, and some other Quarry Hill residents created Top-Drawer Rubber Stamp Company, which featured art by Crumb, Spiegelman and many other cartoonists and artists. This hand-made art rubber stamp company provided employment for several Quarry Hill residents for a time.

Barbara Hall Fiske designed several images for Top-Drawer including angels, an image of William Blake (Quarry Hill’s favorite poet and artist), and more.

Hall divorced Fiske in the 1970s, created Lyman Hall, Inc. (after a collateral ancestor who was a signer of the Declaration of Independence) to run the Quarry Hill property, and took the name Barbara Fiske Calhoun after her second marriage in the 1990s.

One of her “Pat Parker, War Nurse” stories was reprinted recently in Divas, Dames & Daredevils: Lost Heroines of Golden Age Comics edited by Mike Madrid.

Market Monday: Picks of the Week - April 23, 2014 New Releases

Book of the Week

Over Easy by Mimi Pond

A fast-paced memoir about diners, drugs, and California in the 1970s. Over Easy is equal parts time capsule of late 1970s life in California - with its deadheads, punks, disco rollers, casual sex and drug use - and bildungsroman of a young woman from naïve, sexually inexperienced art-school dropout to self-aware, self-confident artist. Mimi Pond’s chatty, slyly observant anecdotes create a compelling portrait of a distinct moment in time. Over Easy is an immediate, limber, and precise memoir narrated with an eye for the humor in every situation.

~Preview~

Singles of the Week

Catwoman #30, written by Ann Nocenti

"The Race of Outlaws" begins! Despite her best efforts, Selina Kyle just can’t stop being Catwoman. What’s dragged her back into the catsuit? A globe-trotting contest that will have her competing to earn the prize for being the best thief in the world. But watch out, Catwoman - there’s no honor among thieves!

~Preview~

Vamplets: The Undead Pet Society #1, written by Gayle Middleton, art by Amanda Coronado

The Legend of the Ghost Pony begins here in this terrifyingly sweet installment from Hasbro designer/illustrator of My Little Pony Gayle Middleton! Ghost Ponies have been the harbingers of the weird for years. Whenever they appear, creatures near have disappeared, never to return. Where do they come from? What is their terrible secret? And what is the Ghost Pony’s connection to a vampyre baby named Lily Rose Shadowlyn? Find out in this all new adventure! Variant cover by Gayle Middleton herself (limited to 1000 copies!).

Collection of the Week

A Distant Soil vol. 2: The Ascendant TP by Colleen Doran

A small team of champions band together to protect young Liana from the Hierarchy, a corrupt otherworld government determined to destroy her. Unknown to the Hierarchy, Seren, their enshrined Avatar, a powerful psionic and religious leader, secretly aids Liana, and plots a coup to overthrow his masters.

Webcomics Wednesday

Maddy McGee, P.I., written by Britt Baker

Follow private investigator Madison “Maddy” McGee and her team as they attempt to solve cases for which the proper authorities don’t have the time. In Maddy’s world robots walk the streets alongside humans, and crime is still as rampant as ever.

They’ve only known each other for a few years, but these three college grads are almost like family to each other. They all grew up very differently—financially, psychologically, socially—but the chemistry between the trio is perfect. So when Maddy suggested the idea they travel to a new location every year or so as small-time private investigators, the other two didn’t hesitate to agree.

You can follow maddymcgeepi right here on Tumblr. Britt Baker has also has a short story being made into a movie! Subject 1 ”is the story of an almost genetically perfect human…re-stationed to Mars as her one human flaw threatens to destroy her chances of survival on Earth. There she battles her inner demons, and others imprisoned in the station’s cells, known as ‘Subjects’.” Awesome.

Market Monday: All-Ages New Releases - April 16, 2014

Adventure Time #27, covers by Brittney Williams, Sabrina Scott, and Chrystin Garland

This special arc with guest artist Jim Rugg continues!! Finn and Jake might have finally met their match, but what will happen with it turns out that the match isn’t a match at all? Things are getting crazy in the land of Ooo and it looks like our heroes might need someone to save them this time around.

~Preview~

Regular Show vol. 1 TP, art by Allison Strejlau

It’s a comic that is anything but regular! Benson just wants to have a quiet concert in the park…too bad Muscle Man has other plans! Will Mordecai and Rigby be able to stop the moshing before it gets out of control? Don’t miss these brand new adventures, written by cartoonist KC Green (Gunshow) and drawn by Allison Strejlau!

~Preview~

Market Monday: Small Press New Releases - April 16, 2014

Bohemians: A Graphic History GN, includes work by Sharon Rudahl, Sabrina Jones, Afua Richardson, Rebecca Migdal, Summer McClinton, and Ellen Lindner

The nineteenth-century countercultures that came to define the bohemian lifestyle spanned both sides of the Atlantic, ranging from Walt Whitman to Josephine Baker, and from Gertrude Stein to Thelonius Monk. Bohemians is the graphic history of this movement and its illustrious figures, recovering the utopian ideas behind millennial communities, and covering the rise of Greenwich Village, the multiracial and radical jazz world, and West Coast and Midwest bohemians, among other scenes. Drawn by an all-star cast of comics artists, including rising figures like Sabrina Jones, Lance Tooks, and Summer McClinton, alongside established artists like Peter Kuper and Spain Rodriguez, Bohemians is a broad and entertaining account of the rebel impulse in American cultural history.

Curse #4, colored by Tamra Bonvillain

Laney Griffin has shouldered more heartbreak than most. With his son’s life and his own criminal innocence hanging in the balance, Laney must take drastic measures to stay one step ahead. But as the captive werewolf emerges with the full moon and Sheriff Nora Hughes’ forces close in, the hope for survival looks slim—for father and son.

~Preview~

Ghost #3, written by Kelly Sue DeConnick

While Doctor October sends her demonic enforcers to attack Elisa and her friends, the White City Butcher captures Tommy and Sloane. Ghost will have to choose between uncovering the secrets of her past and protecting everyone’s future! Interdimensional forces turn Chicago into a war zone in the first arc’s clashing conclusion!

Grimm Fairy Tales: Inferno - Age of Darkness, cover by Tina Valentino

Mercy Dante is back! The Age of Darkness is coming and the players are choosing sides between the evil army of the Dark Horde and the forces of good. Until now, Lucifer, the ruler of limbo, has stayed out of the affairs of the Horde and the and its enemies. But the time has come for her to choose a side. Using her loyal servant Mercy, she is out to prove to the Dark One and his Queen that whichever side she chooses, she’s still a force to be reckoned with.

Skyman #4, colored by Marta Martinez Garcia

Fighting for his life thousands of feet above the ground, Skyman faces off against the people who made him a hero—and if he fails, he falls! Literally! They tried to make the perfect weapon, but they got a hero instead. And Skyman intends to act like one, even if it costs him his life!

~Preview~

The Unwritten: Apocalypse #4, cover by Yuko Shimizu

"War Stories," part 3 of 3. Sometimes the closest thing you can find to a friend is your enemy’s enemy. But when Tom tries to enlist the help of Madame Rausch, he discovers that she’s already fighting a war of her own.

Witchblade #174, art by Laura Braga, colored by Betsy Gonia

Is the Witchblade out to reclaim Sara as its rightful host…or is it out for revenge?

~Preview~

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